Quantcast


CURATOR
A pinboard by
George Ng

I have a Doctorate in Biotechnology and I'm an Machine Learning expert based in Hong Kong

PINBOARD SUMMARY

Recent research proves the old saying, that a good friend next door beats a relative far away.

New research suggests that the strength of friendship gets stronger with age and is more powerful than family relationships. In a large study, researchers found that friendships are essential to one's happiness and health as one age.

Researchers analysed information about relationships and self-rated health and happiness from participants worldwide. Findings imply that both family and friend relationships were associated with better health and happiness overall, but only friendships became a higher predictor of health and happiness at advanced ages. The same study observed relationship support/tension and prolonged illness data from older adults in the United States. Findings indicate that friendships were very important when friends were the cause of tension; participants reported more persistent illnesses; when friends were the source of support, participants were happier.

The study concluded that due to the discretionary nature of relationships, over time we retain friends that make us feel good and discard the rest.

OK. Give Me The Details

A study about stress and support in relationships provides the context of the impact of social support net of the stress one experiences in a relationship and the impact of the support one receives. Roles examined include family and friendships related to aspects of higher well-being.

Although the bulk of studies examine only support or only stress, the pattern of studies that do simultaneously examine them suggests that support and stress independently affect health and that the impact of relationship stress may be stronger and more consistently related to wellbeing than social support.

General social support was more strongly related to well-being in older adults than in young adults, implying that the impact of support may be heightened among older adults.

Older adults experienced lower levels of stress from their partner, more support and less stress from children, higher levels of support and lower levels of stress from their mother, and more support and less stress from friends/relatives than the other two age groups.

8 ITEMS PINNED

Friends and Family: The Role of Relationships in Community and Workplace Attachment

Abstract: Abstract Purpose Most work–life research focuses on the spillover of the nuclear family to the workplace, offering little insight into how other family relationships and friendships can spill over to affect employees’ organizational attachment. Past research has also overlooked the role of relationship quality and the mechanisms underlying these life-to-work spillover effects. Addressing these shortcomings, we integrate the systemic model of community attachment with job embeddedness theory to develop a model of community relational embeddedness and then use this model to examine how nonwork relationships connect people to their workplaces. Design/Methodology/Approach We used survey data from a national sample of 2025 accounting professionals and tested mediation hypotheses using structural equation modeling. Findings Employees’ relationships with friends and family predicted their attachment to their communities, which in turn predicted their workplace turnover intentions. Supporting our theoretical model, bonds with friends and family predicted moving intentions, and community fit and sacrifice mediated these effects. Community fit and sacrifice also predicted work turnover intentions indirectly through moving intentions. Tests also revealed that, surprisingly, friendships had a stronger impact on community attachment than family. Implications Employees are connected to their organizations through an array of close community relationships that extend beyond the nuclear family (i.e., spouse, children). Organizations can enhance employees’ workplace attachment by recognizing the role of friends and offering work–life programs that use a broad conceptualization of family (e.g., adult siblings, parents). Originality/Value Our study illustrates the importance of community relationships to workplace attachment, and the need to incorporate relational quality, nonnuclear family, and friendships in future research. Abstract Purpose Most work–life research focuses on the spillover of the nuclear family to the workplace, offering little insight into how other family relationships and friendships can spill over to affect employees’ organizational attachment. Past research has also overlooked the role of relationship quality and the mechanisms underlying these life-to-work spillover effects. Addressing these shortcomings, we integrate the systemic model of community attachment with job embeddedness theory to develop a model of community relational embeddedness and then use this model to examine how nonwork relationships connect people to their workplaces. PurposeMost work–life research focuses on the spillover of the nuclear family to the workplace, offering little insight into how other family relationships and friendships can spill over to affect employees’ organizational attachment. Past research has also overlooked the role of relationship quality and the mechanisms underlying these life-to-work spillover effects. Addressing these shortcomings, we integrate the systemic model of community attachment with job embeddedness theory to develop a model of community relational embeddedness and then use this model to examine how nonwork relationships connect people to their workplaces. Design/Methodology/Approach We used survey data from a national sample of 2025 accounting professionals and tested mediation hypotheses using structural equation modeling. Design/Methodology/ApproachWe used survey data from a national sample of 2025 accounting professionals and tested mediation hypotheses using structural equation modeling. Findings Employees’ relationships with friends and family predicted their attachment to their communities, which in turn predicted their workplace turnover intentions. Supporting our theoretical model, bonds with friends and family predicted moving intentions, and community fit and sacrifice mediated these effects. Community fit and sacrifice also predicted work turnover intentions indirectly through moving intentions. Tests also revealed that, surprisingly, friendships had a stronger impact on community attachment than family. FindingsEmployees’ relationships with friends and family predicted their attachment to their communities, which in turn predicted their workplace turnover intentions. Supporting our theoretical model, bonds with friends and family predicted moving intentions, and community fit and sacrifice mediated these effects. Community fit and sacrifice also predicted work turnover intentions indirectly through moving intentions. Tests also revealed that, surprisingly, friendships had a stronger impact on community attachment than family. Implications Employees are connected to their organizations through an array of close community relationships that extend beyond the nuclear family (i.e., spouse, children). Organizations can enhance employees’ workplace attachment by recognizing the role of friends and offering work–life programs that use a broad conceptualization of family (e.g., adult siblings, parents). ImplicationsEmployees are connected to their organizations through an array of close community relationships that extend beyond the nuclear family (i.e., spouse, children). Organizations can enhance employees’ workplace attachment by recognizing the role of friends and offering work–life programs that use a broad conceptualization of family (e.g., adult siblings, parents). Originality/Value Our study illustrates the importance of community relationships to workplace attachment, and the need to incorporate relational quality, nonnuclear family, and friendships in future research. Originality/ValueOur study illustrates the importance of community relationships to workplace attachment, and the need to incorporate relational quality, nonnuclear family, and friendships in future research.

Pub.: 07 Oct '16, Pinned: 12 Jun '17

The impact of social networks on the relationship between functional impairment and depressive symptoms in older adults.

Abstract: To examine the role of meaningful relationship characteristics, defined here as social network type, in relation to the association between functional impairment and depressive symptoms.The sample included respondents aged 65 years and older (n = 26,401) from the fourth wave of the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE). Respondents were classified into one of seven relationship network types (Distal Children (living at a distance), Proximal Family (living nearby), Spouse, Other Family, Friend, Other, and No Network) according to the predominant characteristics of their most meaningful relationships. A two-stage regression analysis was performed in which the number of depressive symptoms was first regressed on the extent of functional impairment and network type, controlling for sociodemographic characteristics, cognition, health, and country. In the second stage, variables representing the interactions between functional impairment and network type were considered.The compositional characteristics of respondents' relationships in later life, as defined by social network type, were associated with depressive symptoms. In particular, when experiencing functional impairment, those without any meaningful relationships were found to have more depressive symptoms when compared to all other network types. The findings underscore the importance of meaningful relationships for the mental health of older adults experiencing functional impairment as well as the risk of experiencing depression among those who maintain no personal social network.The study shows that differing constellations of meaningful relationships in later life yield different associations with mental health, especially when taking functional limitations into account.

Pub.: 07 May '15, Pinned: 12 Jun '17