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A pinboard by
Aniruddha Acharya

Doctoral candidate, University of Louisiana at Lafayette

PINBOARD SUMMARY

Microsatellites are tandem repeat sequences found in DNA of plants and animals. These are very helpful for genetic studies and have application in agriculture, plant breeding, conservation genetics, population genetics and several other branches of biology. They are widely used because they are easy to assay using polymerase chain reaction, however, their development is time consuming and expensive. Thus plant scientists have developed these markers only for plants which have high agricultural value. Switchgrass is a potential candidate for biofuel crops and is one of those plants which we can term as orphan plant because this plant has been neglected when it comes to genetic and molecular studies. Comparative genetics have reveled a considerable amount of DNA sequence similarities within closely related species including members of grass family. Sorghum and switchgrass are closely related and both belong to grass family and are expected to have high sequence similarity. I am studying the potential of transferability of sorghum microsatellite markers to switchgrass. This study can revel new markers for switchgrass and also can help in gene ontology and phylogenetic study.

4 ITEMS PINNED

Development of a set of genomic microsatellite markers in tea (Camellia L.) (Camelliaceae)

Abstract: Tea (Camellia L.) is the world’s most consumed health drink and is also important economically. Due to its self-incompatible and outcrossing nature, tea is composed of highly heterogeneous germplasm. It is a perennial, slow-growing crop and hence the successful release of new improved cultivars following conventional breeding methods takes years. In this context, a DNA marker-based molecular breeding approach holds great promise in accelerating genetic improvement programs in tea. Here we describe the isolation of a set of highly polymorphic genomic microsatellite markers using the enrichment approach, which may be useful for phylogenetic and marker-assisted breeding programs in tea. The enriched library comprising 3,205 clones was screened for the presence of microsatellites using a three-primer-based colony PCR method. Four hundred positive clones were selected and sequenced, to reveal 153 sequences containing simple sequence repeats. Seventy-eight primer pairs were designed from repeat-positive sequences, out of which 40 primer pairs produced successful amplifications. Twenty-two of these primer pairs, when tested on a panel of 21 diverse tea clones and accessions, were found to be highly polymorphic, resulting in 137 alleles with an average of 6.76 alleles per primer pair. The polymorphic information content (PIC), expected heterozygosity (He) and observed heterozygosity (Ho) of the polymorphic markers ranged from 0.1 to 0.9, 0.1–0.9 and 0.0–0.8, with average values of 0.6 ± 0.18, 0.7 ± 0.17 and 0.5 ± 0.22, respectively. These markers can be applied for various diversity analyses, mapping programs and genotyping of tea crop.

Pub.: 20 Jun '13, Pinned: 27 Jun '17

Development of genome-wide SSR markers in melon with their cross-species transferability analysis and utilization in genetic diversity study

Abstract: Abstract Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are one of the most informative and widely used molecular markers in plant research. The melon draft genome has provided a powerful tool for SSR marker development in this species in which there are still not enough SSR markers. We therefore developed genome-wide SSR markers from melon, which were used for genetic diversity analysis in melon accessions and comparative mapping with cucumber and watermelon. A total of 44,265 microsatellites from the melon genome were characterized, of which 28,570 SSR markers were developed. In silico PCR analysis with these SSR markers identified 4002 and 1085 with one amplicon in cucumber and watermelon genome, respectively. With these cross-species transferable melon SSR markers, the chromosome synteny between melon and cucumber as well as watermelon was established, which revealed complicated mosaic patterns of syntenic blocks among them. We experimentally validated 384 SSR markers, from which 42 highly informative SSR ones were selected for genetic diversity and population structure analysis among 118 melon accessions. The large number of melon SSR markers developed in this study provides a valuable resource for genetic linkage map construction, molecular mapping, and marker-assisted selection (MAS) in melon. Furthermore, the cross-species transferable SSR markers could also be useful in various molecular marker-related studies in other closely related species in Cucurbitaceae family in which draft genomes are not yet available.AbstractSimple sequence repeats (SSRs) are one of the most informative and widely used molecular markers in plant research. The melon draft genome has provided a powerful tool for SSR marker development in this species in which there are still not enough SSR markers. We therefore developed genome-wide SSR markers from melon, which were used for genetic diversity analysis in melon accessions and comparative mapping with cucumber and watermelon. A total of 44,265 microsatellites from the melon genome were characterized, of which 28,570 SSR markers were developed. In silico PCR analysis with these SSR markers identified 4002 and 1085 with one amplicon in cucumber and watermelon genome, respectively. With these cross-species transferable melon SSR markers, the chromosome synteny between melon and cucumber as well as watermelon was established, which revealed complicated mosaic patterns of syntenic blocks among them. We experimentally validated 384 SSR markers, from which 42 highly informative SSR ones were selected for genetic diversity and population structure analysis among 118 melon accessions. The large number of melon SSR markers developed in this study provides a valuable resource for genetic linkage map construction, molecular mapping, and marker-assisted selection (MAS) in melon. Furthermore, the cross-species transferable SSR markers could also be useful in various molecular marker-related studies in other closely related species in Cucurbitaceae family in which draft genomes are not yet available.

Pub.: 10 Nov '16, Pinned: 27 Jun '17