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CURATOR

I write stories for children, articles for teenagers, audiobooks for parents. I also work on my PhD.

PINBOARD SUMMARY

Digital storytelling is a powerful instructional tool that will help you tell compelling stories.

The Science of Storytelling

“But especially he loved to run in the dim twilight of the summer midnights, listening to the subdued and sleepy murmurs of the forest, reading signs and sounds as man may read a book, and seeking for the mysterious something that called--called, waking or sleeping, at all times, for him to come.”

Do you know what happened in your brain while reading this short passage from Jack’s London famous book “The Call of the Wild”? Numerous neural regions fired up so that you can experience what London’s character experienced in this amazing scene from nature. The word “run” activated your motor cortex, the word “murmurs” fired up your auditory cortex and the “dim twilight” set the visual scene for the feeling of freedom – that unique feeling that you get only in nature – to surround you and bring you peace and delight.

Storytelling is a very powerful tool that makes people want to listen. Unlike statistics, the information presented in a story fashioned way makes people relate to the storyteller and even take action if required or suggested. Stories draw their power from the impact they have on our body. They trigger emotions and emotions cause the releasing of neurochemicals that make us happy, curious, surprised or fearful. A certain chain of words can make you scared, cortisol is released and all of a sudden your attention to what is presented next is sharpened. On the other hand, a phrase can enhance your empathetic emotions and oxytocin starts to flow in your body making you feel safe and loving towards others.

We are wired for liking stories. We are familiar with stories even from our mother’s womb. We think in stories and our conversations are in fact mutual storytellings that cause our brain to synchronize with the brain of the storyteller. In fact, neuroscientist Uri Hasson from Princeton University claims that a story is the only tool that makes the listener turn the story into their own experience or idea.

Today, one of the most popular forms of telling a story is through digital storytelling. This powerful instructional tool combines the art of telling a compelling story with digital multimedia (i.e., images, graphics, audio, music, video etc).

The articles in this pinboard will show you the science behind digital storytelling and the benefits you’ll obtain from creating and telling your own story. Enjoy!

19 ITEMS PINNED

Students as collaborators in creating meaningful learning experiences in technology-enhanced classrooms: An engaged scholarship approach

Abstract: In dealing with numerous challenges, higher education instructors need to adapt their pedagogical practices to present students with meaningful, engaged learning experiences that are likely to promote student success and adequately prepare students for the world we live in. As part of this pedagogical transformation instructors also need to consider the potential of digital technologies to assist flexible pedagogies, as well as the role that students can play as partners in transforming the learning process (C. Evans, D. Muijs, & M. Tomlinson. Engaged student learning: high-impact strategies to enhance student achievement. York: Higher Education Academy, 2015, p. 9). In this paper the author reflects on her particular engaged scholarship approach and the important role that her students—as collaborators in the pedagogical transformation process—have played in the creation of meaningful technology-enhanced learning experiences. She describes the evolution of her action inquiry approach over more than a decade and uses one particular project to highlight the value that student voice can contribute to pedagogical transformation. She also underscores the value of a “design for partnership” approach that can be incorporated as an underlying pedagogical approach to facilitate the creation of meaningful learning experiences in a technology-enhanced teaching and learning environment.

Pub.: 20 Feb '17, Pinned: 03 May '17

Analysing language development in a collaborative digital storytelling project: Sociocultural perspectives

Abstract: Digital storytelling is a process of crafting multimodal narratives using video editing software or Web 2.0-based applications. Adopting digital storytelling as a collaborative learning task in the language classroom provides learners with the opportunity to discuss language problems with their peers and co-construct knowledge of their target language. Despite the potential benefits of learner collaboration for language learning, very few studies have investigated how learners of Japanese collaboratively develop knowledge of Japanese in a collaborative digital storytelling project. To identify effective pedagogical strategies, this study drew on the construct of ‘collaborative dialogue’ and the notion of ‘private speech’ to analyze both the processes and the learning outcomes of learner collaboration and knowledge construction during a collaborative digital storytelling project. The findings showed that learners strategically used their first language, grammatical terminologies, and private speech in the process of collaborative knowledge construction during the project. However, they also revealed pedagogical constraints on implementing the project in mixed ability classrooms and a large retention gap in language knowledge. The findings suggest grouping learners into groups of similar proficiency levels so that they can work on learning language at that level.

Pub.: 19 Jul '16, Pinned: 23 Apr '17

Bringing the Book to Life: Responding to Historical Fiction Using Digital Storytelling

Abstract: Using participatory action research, the first researcher functioned as co-teacher in a fifth-grade class in a large northeastern city public school. The researcher and classroom teacher guided 28 students working in book clubs to compose digital stories in response to historical fiction. The research questions were: (a) What interpretations did students have of their historical fiction novels through the mediational tools of digital storytelling? (b) How did the dynamics of the book club structure contribute to the students’ interpretive work? Data sources included students’ process and product work, video and audio recordings of work sessions, reflective notes and journal, a semi-structured interview with the teacher, and stimulated recall interviews with three case study book clubs. Both researchers used multimodal analysis, particularly the concept transmediation, concepts of interpretation in reader response, and grounded theory, informed by activity theory, to analyze data. Findings show students’ expression of and limits to interpretation in the multimodal ensembles of their digital stories. The purposeful use of digital technology generated ongoing problem solving. Activity systems expanded students’ learning by generating collaborative zones of proximal development, a dialectic among mediational tools, and opportunities to take on roles that shaped students’ identities and repositioned who they could be in this learning community. The study shows the value of project-based multimodal responses using digital technologies in collaborative groups to develop students’ comprehension of literary texts. The study suggests an alternative to writing-to-learn practices that dominate the implementation of the Common Core State Standards, and that high-stakes tests reify.

Pub.: 05 Aug '16, Pinned: 23 Apr '17

Personal voices in higher education: A digital storytelling experience for pre-service teachers

Abstract: Abstract Digital storytelling (DST) has recently emerged as a new tool in instructional environments. DST involves the combination of media and technology with traditional storytelling to help students learn. This paper examines the use of DST in a university course and pre-service teachers’ perceptions of their learning experiences using this tool. Thirty-eight pre-service teachers participated in the study, in which DST was employed as a learning activity. In the course, the participants created personal digital stories about their careers. Both qualitative and quantitative research methods were used for data collection and analysis. The findings indicate that DST is very useful for learning. The pre-service teachers perceived DST as an attractive way to share ideas and feelings, and valuable for using in lessons. DST served as a practical learning tool to present the students’ personal experiences to others, and the process encouraged emotional interactions. Implications regarding these findings are discussed.AbstractDigital storytelling (DST) has recently emerged as a new tool in instructional environments. DST involves the combination of media and technology with traditional storytelling to help students learn. This paper examines the use of DST in a university course and pre-service teachers’ perceptions of their learning experiences using this tool. Thirty-eight pre-service teachers participated in the study, in which DST was employed as a learning activity. In the course, the participants created personal digital stories about their careers. Both qualitative and quantitative research methods were used for data collection and analysis. The findings indicate that DST is very useful for learning. The pre-service teachers perceived DST as an attractive way to share ideas and feelings, and valuable for using in lessons. DST served as a practical learning tool to present the students’ personal experiences to others, and the process encouraged emotional interactions. Implications regarding these findings are discussed.

Pub.: 01 Sep '16, Pinned: 23 Apr '17

Exploring the Use of Interactive Digital Storytelling Video: Promoting Student Engagement and Learning in a University Hybrid Course

Abstract: Abstract This study explores interactive digital storytelling in a university hybrid course. Digital stories leverage imagery and narrative-based content to explore concepts, while appealing to millennials. When digital storytelling is used as the main source of course content, tensions arise regarding how to engage and support student learning while holding them accountable for watching the video. We explore interactive video as a way to mitigate and engage with these issues. The context is a hybrid sustainability course for preservice teachers that used digital stories in a conventional format in which students could start, stop, and pause the video at will, as well as an interactive format with all the same features, plus programmed pauses for required understanding checks. A survey of students (n = 223) indicated they believed interactive digital stories supported engagement, scaffolded learning, and increased learning gains, but did not increase accountability. Evaluation of quiz performance indicated they recalled significantly more with interactive videos, compared to conventional videos. Implications for practice are discussed.AbstractThis study explores interactive digital storytelling in a university hybrid course. Digital stories leverage imagery and narrative-based content to explore concepts, while appealing to millennials. When digital storytelling is used as the main source of course content, tensions arise regarding how to engage and support student learning while holding them accountable for watching the video. We explore interactive video as a way to mitigate and engage with these issues. The context is a hybrid sustainability course for preservice teachers that used digital stories in a conventional format in which students could start, stop, and pause the video at will, as well as an interactive format with all the same features, plus programmed pauses for required understanding checks. A survey of students (n = 223) indicated they believed interactive digital stories supported engagement, scaffolded learning, and increased learning gains, but did not increase accountability. Evaluation of quiz performance indicated they recalled significantly more with interactive videos, compared to conventional videos. Implications for practice are discussed.conventionalinteractiven

Pub.: 01 Sep '16, Pinned: 23 Apr '17

Digital storytelling in mathematics: a competence-based methodology

Abstract: Abstract This paper concerns with the use of digital storytelling in mathematics education as a competence-based methodology. It seems to be well apt to improve students’ capabilities be active solvers of real world problems, according to PISA framework. We present a storytelling model, which takes into account both research results about storytelling from pedagogical area and from story problems in mathematics education. According to the model, we present a use case, consisting in the implementation of a prototype. This latter has been made available to the Regional School Office of Campania (South of Italy) in the context of a project to support schools activities regarding mathematical literacy. Finally, we report some early students’ perceptions and discuss the constraints and limits of the prototype.AbstractThis paper concerns with the use of digital storytelling in mathematics education as a competence-based methodology. It seems to be well apt to improve students’ capabilities be active solvers of real world problems, according to PISA framework. We present a storytelling model, which takes into account both research results about storytelling from pedagogical area and from story problems in mathematics education. According to the model, we present a use case, consisting in the implementation of a prototype. This latter has been made available to the Regional School Office of Campania (South of Italy) in the context of a project to support schools activities regarding mathematical literacy. Finally, we report some early students’ perceptions and discuss the constraints and limits of the prototype.

Pub.: 30 Aug '16, Pinned: 23 Apr '17

The subjective spaces of social engagement: Cultivating creative living through community-based digital storytelling

Abstract: Abstract Many community-based organizations use digital storytelling as a strategy for community development, aiming to cultivate increased social agency and community leadership in participants through practices of storytelling and media production. Reporting on a three-year study of digital storytelling with newcomer women in Toronto, and drawing on Winnicott’s theories of creative living, this paper suggests that the successes of such social justice projects might be better understood if we consider the ways in which the capacity for social engagement is cultivated through experiences of emotional risk-taking and psychological creativity, and made possible by the holding environment offered to participants.AbstractMany community-based organizations use digital storytelling as a strategy for community development, aiming to cultivate increased social agency and community leadership in participants through practices of storytelling and media production. Reporting on a three-year study of digital storytelling with newcomer women in Toronto, and drawing on Winnicott’s theories of creative living, this paper suggests that the successes of such social justice projects might be better understood if we consider the ways in which the capacity for social engagement is cultivated through experiences of emotional risk-taking and psychological creativity, and made possible by the holding environment offered to participants.

Pub.: 01 Dec '16, Pinned: 23 Apr '17

Silence, voice, and “other languages”: Digital storytelling as a site for resistance and restoration in a South African higher education classroom

Abstract: In order to investigate the composing practices of digital storytellers in a South African context, a qualitative case study, set within a university of technology in South Africa and framed by literature stemming from the disciplines of digital storytelling and composition and rhetoric, was implemented as part of a larger dissertation project initiated in 2014. This study spanned a year and included participant observation and the collection of interviews as primary methods of investigation. Findings linked digital storytelling to creating a liberating classroom space where students could redefine themselves outside of historicized representations. Within a digital storytelling praxis, the story circle component has proven to be an effective means to engage students in both a reflective and critical engagement of their own writing practices, highlighting the synergy between the spoken word, process-based writing, and digital formats for composing. However, questions remain surrounding the ethical practice of digital storytelling in classrooms especially when students share personal stories and those stories are both publicly consumed and graded. Implications for practice cover themes relating to the integration of technology that supports the democratization of varied voices in the public sphere, which is particularly important in post-conflict zone environments like South Africa.

Pub.: 26 Jan '17, Pinned: 23 Apr '17