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I love curry. The most wonderful, fulfilling, vibrant food known. Maximalist, like all of India.

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"Indian food is like classical music raga- it takes time to build up to a crescendo." Shobha Dé

12 items pinned

Using Fish Sauce as a Substitute for Sodium Chloride in Culinary Sauces and Effects on Sensory Properties.

Abstract: Historically, fish sauce has been a standard condiment and ingredient in various Southeast Asian cuisines. Moreover, fish sauce imparts umami taste, which may enhance perceived saltiness in food. This quality suggests that fish sauce may be used as a partial substitute for sodium chloride (NaCl) in food preparation, which may present a valuable option for health-conscious and salt-restricted consumers. However, the degree to which NaCl can be decreased in food products without compromising taste and consumer acceptance has not been determined. We hypothesized that NaCl content in food may be reduced by partial replacement with fish sauce without diminishing palatability and consumer acceptance. Preparations of 3 types of food were assessed to test this hypothesis: chicken broth (n = 72); tomato sauce (n = 73); and coconut curry (n = 70). In the first session, the percentage of NaCl that could be replaced with fish sauce without a significant change in overall taste intensity was determined for each type of food using the 2-Alternative Forced Choice method. In the second session, subjects rated 5 samples for each food with varying NaCl and/or fish sauce content on 3 sensory attributes: deliciousness; taste intensity; and saltiness. Our results demonstrate that NaCl reduction was possible in chicken broth, tomato sauce, and coconut curry at 25%, 16%, and 10%, respectively, without a significant loss (P < 0.05) in deliciousness and overall taste intensity. These results suggest that it is possible to replace NaCl in foods with fish sauce without reducing overall taste intensity and consumer acceptance.

Pub.: 28 Nov '15, Pinned: 20 Sep '16

Effect of post-mortem handling conditions on the quality of spent hen meat curry.

Abstract: Study was performed to determine the effect of post-mortem handling conditions on the physico-chemical and sensory attributes of spent hen meat curry. Breast cuts of spent hens were subjected to different postmortem handling conditions before cooking viz; made into small cuts and cooked within 1-2 h of slaughter (condition 1), made into small cuts and cooked after 4-5 h of slaughter (condition 2), made into small cuts immediately after slaughter, stored at 4 ± 1 °C for 12 h and then cooked (condition 3), stored at 4 ± 1 °C for 12 h, made into small cuts and cooked (condition 4). The pH of meat just before cooking due to different stages of rigor development under various conditions differed accordingly. Observed differences in temperature of meat just before cooking were because of different postmortem handling condition variations viz:1,2,3,&4. The associated post mortem changes under different postmortem handling conditions before cooking led to significant variation in Water holding capacity, Water Soluble Protein, Salt Soluble Protein, cooking yield, moisture percentage before cooking and after cooking and also WB shear force value. In general, sensory scores were higher for conditions 4 and 1 as compared to conditions 2 and 3. Results revealed that quality attributes of spent hen meat curry can be improved by following proper post-slaughter handling and processing conditions. To get meat curry of good sensory quality, meat should be cooked preferably within 1-2 h of slaughter or after 10-12 h of storage of intact carcass at 4 ± 1 °C. Cuts should be made just before cooking but cooking after 4-5 h of slaughter should be avoided.

Pub.: 11 Apr '13, Pinned: 20 Sep '16

Properties of raw meat and meat curry from spent goat in relation with post-mortem handling conditions.

Abstract: The properties of raw meat and meat curry from spent goat meat in relation with post-mortem handling conditions were evaluated. The conditions evaluated were: cooking of meat within 1-2 h post-slaughter (condition 1); deboning meat storage at 25 ± 2 °C for 5-6 h and cooking (condition 2); post-slaughter storage of carcass at room temperature for 5-6 h, then deboning followed by storage of meat at refrigeration temperature for 5-6 h and cooking (condition 3); deboning and storage of meat at 25 ± 2 °C for 10-12 h and cooking (condition 4). Significant difference was observed in pH values in condition 1 (p < 0.01) and moisture content (p < 0.05) of raw meat as compared to the conditions 2, 3 and 4. However, the moisture content of cooked meat was significantly higher (p < 0.05) for conditions 1 and 2 as compared to the conditions 3 and 4. Significant differences were also observed in muscle fiber diameter values of different conditions, that is, the mean values were significantly higher (p < 0.05) for conditions 2 and 4 and significantly lower for condition 1. The mean water holding capacity and cooking yield values were highest in condition 1, followed by conditions 2, 3 and 4. The significant differences was also observed in shear force value of cooked meat chunks, that is, the mean value was significantly higher (p < 0.01) for condition 2 and significantly lower for condition 1. Sensory scores were significantly higher in condition 1 and significantly lower in condition 2. However, sensory scores for condition 4 were almost similar to the condition 1.

Pub.: 08 Jan '13, Pinned: 20 Sep '16