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A pinboard by
Mogaji Hammed

PhD Candidate/Lecturing, Federal University Oye-Ekiti, Nigeria

PINBOARD SUMMARY

The research generated evidence on STH transmission hotspots to guide integrated control programme

Soil Transmitted Helminthiasis (STH) is one of the major public health problem in Nigeria. Infections has direct linkages with access to/and use of improved Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) resources. However, efforts channeled towards complimenting the already existing intervention programme "preventive chemotheraphy" with provision of water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) resources have been hampered by lack of empirical evidence on transmission hotspots to guide integrated control programme and resource distribution. This research therefore used a cross-sectional design involving 1,499 households across 33 communities in Ogun State, Nigeria to bridge such gap. Field visitations were made to recruited households for georeferencing and assessment of condition of WASH resources using carefully WHO/UNICEF set standards. 1027(68.5%) of the sampled households provided fresh feacal samples for laboratory diagnosis of helminths ova using ether concentration. The WASH and STH data were compiled into a GIS database and subjected to preliminary descriptive statistic. Spatial Maps were constructed using ArcGIS software.

Results: By demography, 600(40%) male and 899(60.0) female respondent participated in the study. Of the 20 LGAs examined, 19(95.0%) were endemic for one or more kind of the three main STH species (except Ijebu-Ode). Ascaris lumbricoides infections are the most geographically distributed species, found in 28/33(84.8%) locations and in 19LGAs. Hookworm was present in 19/33(57.6%) locations and in15LGAs. Trichuris trichiura infection was found in 9/33(27.3%) locations and in 7LGAs. An overall cumulative score of 52.9% was recorded for WASH resource conditions. The percentages score ranges between 65.7% and 38.6% across the LGAs. By categories, cumulative scores of 64.1%, 32.8%, 69.0% and 49.3% was recorded for water, sanitation, household hygiene and individual hygiene respectively.

Conclusion: This study provides information on the prevalence and spatial risk of STH and WASH resources in Ogun State. This will serve as decision-support visual tool for Ogun State programme managers to help facilitate integration of STH control into WASH resource programming efforts.

4 ITEMS PINNED

Prevalence, intensity and spatial co-distribution of schistosomiasis and soil transmitted helminths infections in Ogun state, Nigeria

Abstract: A cross-sectional survey was carried out in primary schools to determine prevalence, intensity and spatial co-distribution of Schistosomiasis and soil transmitted helminths (STH) infections in Ogun State, Nigeria. A total of 2148 pupils from 42 schools were examined for Schistosoma and STH infections from urine and fresh fecal samples respectively. Ethyl ether concentration method prepared in sodium acetate – acetic acid – formalin ether was used to concentrate parasites’ ova before microscopic examination. The overall prevalence of schistosomiasis and STH infections were 4.0% (95% CI = 3.21–4.92) and 34.64% (95% CI = 32.62–36.69) respectively. Schistosoma haematobium and Ascaris lumbricoides were the most prevalent across the study area among the Schistosoma and STH species respectively. Overall, intensity of infection was higher in males than in females for all Schistosoma and STH infections, but with no significant difference (P > 0.05), except for Trichuris trichiura (χ 2 = 6.490, P < 0.05). Infection intensity was significantly inversely correlated (χ 2 = 12.953, P < 0.05) with an increase in age group. Co-distribution of Schistosoma and STH infections occurred in 15 (35.7%) out of 42 schools, and only 30 children (1.4%) had co-infection of Schistosoma and STH. This study provides information on the prevalence and spatial risk of schistosomiasis and STH in Ogun State. This will serve as decision-support tool for Ogun State programme managers to help facilitate integration of schistosomiasis and STH control.

Pub.: 01 Jan '18, Pinned: 19 Jun '18