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A pinboard by
Angie Makri

PhD student , University of Bristol

PINBOARD SUMMARY

Investigating how acting out information can lead to better memory performance.

Making a cup of tea or memorising a phone number involve different types of memory. Memory for actions (e.g., making tea) is more automatic and involves less conscious effort. Action memory research can support learning and memory in children as well as older adults with memory problems. For example, several studies have shown that children and adults remember better instructions if they have physically performed them. The reasons behind this phenomenon as well as its exact mechanisms are still under investigation. Further research in this topic will contribute to our understanding of human memory while it has a direct impact in a number of different areas such as: school and classroom learning, interactive technologies and memory interventions for the elderly.

2 ITEMS PINNED

Following instructions from working memory: Why does action at encoding and recall help?

Abstract: Abstract Two experiments investigated the consequences of action at encoding and recall on the ability to follow sequences of instructions. Children ages 7–9 years recalled sequences of spoken action commands under presentation and recall conditions that either did or did not involve their physical performance. In both experiments, recall was enhanced by carrying out the instructions as they were being initially presented and also by performing them at recall. In contrast, the accuracy of instruction-following did not improve above spoken presentation alone, either when the instructions were silently read or heard by the child (Experiment 1), or when the child repeated the spoken instructions as they were presented (Experiment 2). These findings suggest that the enactment advantage at presentation does not simply reflect a general benefit of a dual exposure to instructions, and that it is not a result of their self-production at presentation. The benefits of action-based recall were reduced following enactment during presentation, suggesting that the positive effects of action at encoding and recall may have a common origin. It is proposed that the benefits of physical movement arise from the existence of a short-term motor store that maintains the temporal, spatial, and motoric features of either planned or already executed actions.AbstractTwo experiments investigated the consequences of action at encoding and recall on the ability to follow sequences of instructions. Children ages 7–9 years recalled sequences of spoken action commands under presentation and recall conditions that either did or did not involve their physical performance. In both experiments, recall was enhanced by carrying out the instructions as they were being initially presented and also by performing them at recall. In contrast, the accuracy of instruction-following did not improve above spoken presentation alone, either when the instructions were silently read or heard by the child (Experiment 1), or when the child repeated the spoken instructions as they were presented (Experiment 2). These findings suggest that the enactment advantage at presentation does not simply reflect a general benefit of a dual exposure to instructions, and that it is not a result of their self-production at presentation. The benefits of action-based recall were reduced following enactment during presentation, suggesting that the positive effects of action at encoding and recall may have a common origin. It is proposed that the benefits of physical movement arise from the existence of a short-term motor store that maintains the temporal, spatial, and motoric features of either planned or already executed actions.12

Pub.: 01 Nov '16, Pinned: 10 Apr '18