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CURATOR
A pinboard by
George Ng

I have a Doctorate in Biotechnology and I'm a machine learning expert based in Hong Kong.

PINBOARD SUMMARY

Social media use mediated by loneliness improves well-being when the support network size is large.

Elderly Social Media Use Reduces Loneliness

A recent study centred on elderly adoption of social media as a bridge to overcome loneliness shows that technology increased social support, resulting in better mental and physical health.

The study concluded that social media use resulted in less loneliness and increased mental, physical health, empowering older adults to be fully engaged with life.

Internet Use and Well-Being in Older Adults

Another study developed an integrative research model to determine the nature of the relationships among Internet use, isolation, social support, fulfilment and psychological well-being.

The results imply that frequent use of the Internet has an indirect influence on improving psychological well-being among older adults. Supporting previous reports that have suggested that Internet use can be beneficial to well-being in later life. This study offers an insight that social networking in modern society helps restore and maintain social relationships.

How Exactly Does Social Network Composition Lead To Relationship Satisfaction?

In a study that examined the correlation between social support network dynamics with well-being. Findings imply that support network size correlates with well-being as individuals with extensive support networks are happier. Social support network size has been suggested to be relevant in the twilight years due to a greater potential pool of social support partners available to meet older adults' increasing need for adequate support.

The quality of relationships improves when individuals have larger support networks, as support needs are spread across a wider network of individuals, reducing the demand or burden that support members might experience.

10 ITEMS PINNED

Case Management Promotion of Social Media for the Elderly Who Live Alone.

Abstract: Professional case managers advocate patient access to necessary and appropriate services, while educating the patient and family and/or caregiver about resource availability within practice settings. The purpose of this article is to explain the role case managers can have to promote the use of social media by the elderly, as a means to decrease their loneliness and isolation.The promotion of the use of social media will take place in the community setting, involving willing and competent elderly patients who live alone. It is framed as one strategy to help combat loneliness. The primary target audiences for this initiative are case managers who work in the community, as they are the ones who have contact with this population. However, hospital case managers could also benefit, as they need to be aware of ways to help discharged elderly patients feel more connected to their community; the use of social media is one way to achieve this outcome.The elderly population experience changes brought on by their longer life. One of those changes or undesirable effects is an increase in social isolation and experiencing loneliness. There are many factors that contribute to loneliness and social isolation in the elderly such as a change in financial situations, death, divorce, or migration. Utilizing the capabilities of the internet, coupled with the use of social media (e.g., Facebook), can facilitate opening up a virtual world where the elderly can communicate with family and friends, make new friends, or occupy their time with the many interactive games that are available online.Case managers should increase their awareness to identify patients who are socially isolated; the outcome is to decrease the risk of developing a major depressive disorder. Community case managers might at times be the only professional health care givers who are visiting patients in their home; therefore, they should also be aware of the signs and symptoms of depression so they can encourage patients to get the necessary help needed as soon as possible. This article identifies key case management strategies to promote the use of social media by isolated elderly clients that include assessment of their learning needs and capabilities, devising a plan of action, implementation of technology, and evaluation and follow-up of the implementation.

Pub.: 06 Feb '16, Pinned: 14 Jun '17

Reducing social isolation and loneliness in older people: a systematic review protocol.

Abstract: Social isolation and loneliness affect approximately one-third to one-half of the elderly population and have a negative impact on their physical and mental health. Group-based interventions where facilitators are well trained and where the elderly are actively engaged in their development seem to be more effective, but conclusions have been limited by weak study designs. We aim to conduct a systematic review to assess the effectiveness of health promotion interventions on social isolation or loneliness in older people.A systematic review was conducted in Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Applied Social Sciences Index and Abstracts, LILACS, OpenGrey and the Cochrane Library on peer-reviewed studies and doctoral theses published between 1995 and 2016 evaluating the impact of health promotion interventions on social isolation and/or loneliness for individuals aged 60 and over. Two reviewers will independently assess each study for inclusion and disagreements will be resolved by a third reviewer. Data will be extracted using a predefined pro forma following best practice. Study quality will be assessed with the Effective Public Health Practice Project quality assessment tool. A narrative synthesis of all studies will be presented by type of outcome (social isolation or loneliness) and type of intervention. If feasible, the effectiveness data will be synthesised using appropriate statistical techniques.This systematic review is exempt from ethics approval because the work is carried out on published documents. The findings of the review will be disseminated in a related peer-reviewed journal and presented at conferences. They will also contribute to a DPhil thesis.CRD42016039650.

Pub.: 19 May '17, Pinned: 14 Jun '17

Frailty, pain and psychological variables among older adults living in Hong Kong nursing homes: can we do better to address multimorbidities?

Abstract: WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: Frailty and multimorbidity are common in later life. A higher level of frailty is associated with a higher risk of adverse physical and psychological health situations. Older adults with pain have been reported to be lonelier and more depressed, as well as less happy and less satisfied with their life as compared to those without pain. In view of the high prevalence of pain among older adults and the reversibility of frailty, it is important to explore the relationship between pain, frailty and psychological parameters in order to devise patient-centred interventions. WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: Frailty index is positively correlated with the presence of pain, and associated with gender, functional mobility and loneliness. Among these significant variables, loneliness was the factor that contributed the most to the frailty index. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: It is essential to put the focus of healthcare on both the physical and psychological aspects of well-being. All nurses are advised to improve the management of pain in older people in order to lower the levels of pain, frailty and psychological distress among this population. Nursing care should address the loneliness level especially the problem of social loneliness among older adults particularly those living in nursing homes.Introduction In view of the high prevalence of pain among older adults and the reversibility of frailty, it is important to explore the relationship between pain, frailty and psychological parameters in order to devise patient-centred interventions. Aim To examine the levels of frailty, pain and psychological parameters among older adults living in Hong Kong nursing homes, and the cross-sectional relationships among these items. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among 178 residents from six nursing homes. Frailty, pain, mobility, happiness, loneliness and life satisfaction of participants were assessed using validated questionnaires. Results A multiple linear regression (R(2)  = 0.338, P < 0.05) showed that the frailty index was associated with loneliness, functional mobility and gender. Among these significant variables, loneliness was the factor that contributed the most to the frailty index. Discussion It is essential to put the focus of healthcare on both the physical and psychological aspects of well-being. Findings suggest that apart from improving mobility and reducing pain, loneliness could be a target of psychosocial interventions to reduce frailty and improve quality of life. Implications for practice It is advised that nursing care should address loneliness, especially the problem of social loneliness among older adults particularly those living in nursing homes.

Pub.: 17 Jun '16, Pinned: 12 Jun '17