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CURATOR
A pinboard by
NATALIA RODRIGUEZ

Graduated in Medicine at Complutense University of Madrid, Spain.

Specialist in the field of Gynecology and Obstetrics from 2015.

I was working in public health care hospitals and private clinic in Madrid. Started my PhD program in Cancer and Pregnancy at General University Hospital Gregorio Marañon, Madrid, when I was in my second year of my residency program. Then, I was awarded with a Foundation Grant to finish it in New York City. USA.

I was working as a Clinical Research Fellow in Gynecology Oncology Department at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, in New York City. Currently, I am working as a fellow in GYNONC at Columbia University in the city of New York.

Education: Columbia University of the City of New York. USA.2017 Weill Cornell Medicine. New York. USA. 2016 University of Texas. Houston. USA. 2014. Complutense University of Madrid. Spain. 2010

Hospital Experience: Clínical research fellowship in GYNONC, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. New York. USA. Gynecology Oncology training, MD Anderson Cancer center, Houston, Texas. USA Obstetrics Ultrasound, University Hospital Gregorio Marañon. Madrid. Spain. Reproductive Medicine, Fundacion Jimenez Diaz, Madrid. Spain Pelvic pathology, Fuenlabrada Hospital, Madrid. Spain ] Breast Radiology, University Hospital of Mostoles, Madrid. Spain General and Digestive Surgery training, Semmelweis Klinika, Budapest, Hungary.

Research Experience: Clinical Research Fellowship in Gynecology Oncology at Columbia University, New York. USA. Clinical Research Fellowship in Gynecology Oncology at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York. USA. Clinical Research Fellowship in Cancer and Pregnancy at General University Hospital Gregorio Marañon, Madrid. Spain.

Other Activities: Reviewer "The journal of minimally invasive Gynecology" JMIG

doing my Phd Program in endometrial carcinoma and sentinel lymph node mapping, trying to improve the people quality of life.

PINBOARD SUMMARY

To assess the clinicopathologic characteristics and outcomes of patients diagnosed withsynchronous e

Objectives: To assess the clinicopathologic characteristics and outcomes of patients diagnosed withsynchronous endometrial and ovarian carcinoma compared to those with endometrial carcinoma and metastasis to the ovaries. Methods: All patients with endometrial cancer who underwent primary surgery at our institution between 06/1993 and 09/2014 were identified. We included cases with carcinoma in the endometrium and ovary. Pathology reports were reviewed to determine the pathologist’s assessment of whether the ovarian carcinomas were synchronous or metastatic. Patients with stage IV endometrial carcinoma, irrespective of presence of ovarian disease were excluded. Appropriate statistical tests were performed.
Results: 76 cases were identified. 19 were considered as synchronous endometrial and ovarian carcinomas (SEOC), while the remaining 57 cases were classified as endometrial carcinoma with ovarian metastasis (ECOM). The median age was 52 (range: 32-71)and 63 (range: 43-89) years, respectively (p=0.4). Non-endometrioid histology of was seen in only 21% of SEOC as compared to 58% in ECOM (P=0.006). No myoinvasion was noted in 32% SEOC compared to only 9% ECOM (P=0.01). The presence of endometriosis was noted in 58% SEOC compared to 4% ECOM (p<0.0001) The median follow-up time was 44.2 months (range: 0.4-201.4) for the entire cohort. The 4-year progression-free survival (PFS) was 82% (SE+/-9.5) for SEOC and 51.6% (SE+/- 7) for ECOM group (p=0.06). The 4-year overall survival (OS) was 94.7% (SE+/-5.1) for SEOC and 69.8% (SE+/-6.2) for ECOM(p=0.046). 4-years PFS for endometrioid histology only cases was 84% (SE+/-10.6) for SEOC vs 77.8% (SE+/-8.87) for ECOM (p=0.97). 4-years OS for endometrioid histology was 93.3% (SE+/-8.4) for SEOC vs 81.9% (SE+/-8.2) ECOM (p=0.3).

Conclusions: SEOC was associated with more favorable endometrial factors and with the presence of endometriosis. SEOC was associated with better survival outcomes but not when analyzing endometrioid histology alone.

8 ITEMS PINNED

Clinicopathological comparison of colorectal and endometrial carcinomas in patients with Lynch-like syndrome versus patients with Lynch syndrome.

Abstract: Screening for DNA mismatch repair (MMR) deficiency in colorectal and endometrial carcinomas identifies patients at risk for Lynch syndrome. Some patients with MMR-deficient tumors have no evidence of a germline mutation and have been described as having Lynch-like syndrome. We compared the clinicopathological features of colorectal and endometrial carcinomas in patients with Lynch-like syndrome and Lynch syndrome. Universal screening identified 356 (10.6%) of 3352 patients with colorectal carcinoma and 72 (33%) of 215 patients with endometrial carcinoma with deficient DNA MMR. Sixty-six patients underwent germline mutation analysis with 45 patients (68%) having evidence of a germline MMR gene mutation confirming Lynch syndrome and 21 patients (32%) having Lynch-like syndrome with no evidence of a germline mutation. Most patients with Lynch-like syndrome had carcinoma involving the right colon compared to patients with Lynch syndrome (93% versus 45%; P < .002). All patients with colorectal carcinomas demonstrating isolated loss of MSH6 expression had Lynch syndrome confirmed by germline mutation analysis. Synchronous or metachronous Lynch syndrome-associated carcinoma was more frequently identified in patients with Lynch syndrome compared to Lynch-like syndrome (38% versus 7%; P = .04). There were no significant differences in clinicopathological variables between patients with Lynch-like syndrome and Lynch syndrome with endometrial carcinoma. In summary, 32% of patients with MMR deficiency concerning Lynch syndrome will have Lynch-like syndrome. Our results demonstrate that patients with Lynch-like syndrome are more likely to have right-sided colorectal carcinoma, less likely to have synchronous or metachronous Lynch syndrome-associated carcinoma, and less likely to demonstrate isolated loss of MSH6 expression within their tumor.

Pub.: 01 Sep '15, Pinned: 18 Sep '17

Significant frequency of MSH2/MSH6 abnormality in ovarian endometrioid carcinoma supports histotype‐specific Lynch syndrome screening in ovarian carcinomas

Abstract: Lynch syndrome screening in ovarian carcinoma is controversial. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency of deficient mismatch repair (dMMR) protein in a retrospective cohort enriched for non‐high‐grade serous carcinomas and its association with outcome within histological types.Tissue microarrays representing 612 ovarian carcinomas were tested for mismatch repair proteins (MLH1, PMS2, MSH2, and MSH6) by immunohistochemistry. dMMR was detected in 13.8% of endometrioid and 2.4% of clear cell carcinomas, but not in other histological types. Within endometrioid carcinomas, 11 of 25 dMMR cases showed abnormal MLH1/PMS2, 10 cases showed abnormal MSH2/MSH6, and four cases showed only abnormal MSH6, indicating that at least 7.7% of endometrioid carcinomas have dMMR probably related to Lynch syndrome. The four dMMR clear cell carcinomas showed abnormal MSH2/MSH6 in three cases and only abnormal MSH6 in one case, all probably related to Lynch syndrome. Within endometrioid carcinomas, dMMR was significantly associated with age <50 years, synchronous endometrial endometrioid carcinoma, a higher CA125 level at diagnosis, higher FIGO grade, absence of ARID1A, and at least 20 CD8‐positive intraepithelial lymphocytes per high‐power field, but was not associated with cancer‐specific death. Age <50 years, higher CA125 levels at diagnosis and at least 20 CD8‐positive intraepithelial lymphocytes per high‐power field remained significant after adjustment for multiple testing, but their sensitivity for identifying dMMR remained insufficient.Our data support the policy of histotype‐specific Lynch syndrome screening in ovarian carcinoma confined to endometrioid and clear cell carcinomas.

Pub.: 26 Feb '16, Pinned: 18 Sep '17

NATALIA RODRIGUEZ

Graduated in Medicine at Complutense University of Madrid, Spain. Specialist in the field of Gynecology and Obstetrics from 2015. I was working in public health care hospitals and private clinic in Madrid. Started my PhD program in Cancer and Pregnancy at General University Hospital Gregorio Marañon, Madrid, when I was in my second year of my residency program. Then, I was awarded with a Foundation Grant to finish it in New York City. USA. I was working as a Clinical Research Fellow in Gynecology Oncology Department at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, in New York City. Currently, I am working as a fellow in GYNONC at Columbia University in the city of New York. Education: Columbia University of the City of New York. USA.2017 Weill Cornell Medicine. New York. USA. 2016 University of Texas. Houston. USA. 2014. Complutense University of Madrid. Spain. 2010 Hospital Experience: Clínical research fellowship in GYNONC, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. New York. USA. Gynecology Oncology training, MD Anderson Cancer center, Houston, Texas. USA Obstetrics Ultrasound, University Hospital Gregorio Marañon. Madrid. Spain. Reproductive Medicine, Fundacion Jimenez Diaz, Madrid. Spain Pelvic pathology, Fuenlabrada Hospital, Madrid. Spain ] Breast Radiology, University Hospital of Mostoles, Madrid. Spain General and Digestive Surgery training, Semmelweis Klinika, Budapest, Hungary. Research Experience: Clinical Research Fellowship in Gynecology Oncology at Columbia University, New York. USA. Clinical Research Fellowship in Gynecology Oncology at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York. USA. Clinical Research Fellowship in Cancer and Pregnancy at General University Hospital Gregorio Marañon, Madrid. Spain. Other Activities: Reviewer "The journal of minimally invasive Gynecology" JMIG