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CURATOR
A pinboard by
Sonali Narang

Assistant Professor, Arya College

PINBOARD SUMMARY

Climate change presents significant challenges for South Asia, some of the most critical issues area related to climate change includes, the melting of Himalayan glaciers, increased frequency of flood and droughts, the problem of drinking water and large scale displacements and human migration increasing flooding of settlements and infrastructure, heat related deaths and food and water shortages. Extreme heat is already disturbing the growing season for regions in India, Bangladesh and Pakistan. Wheat production in the Indian portion of a fertile area, the Indo-Gangetic Plains may decrease by up to fifty percent by 2100, harming the hundreds of millions of people who rely on it for food. The majority of South Asian countries are lower-middle income countries that already struggle to support the daily needs of their growing populations. The risk and uncertainties associated with climate change compel us to rethink and reimagining the notions of geographical distance and proximity. Geographical location is going to play a major role in how effectively communities adapting to climate change. Those living in low-lying coastal zones and flood plains in South Asia are probably most at risk from climate change impacts. In many parts of region rural poverty and vulnerability could be exacerbated due to the ramification of climate change on rice production, increase in food prices and cost of living. The frequency of hot days in South Asia is likely to increase further in the future (IPCC, 2015). Therefore, multiple challenges across multiple scales and places are likely to increase in South Asia in future. Given such a scenario, the thought of climate governance is acquiring attention across geographies and requiring stroke of adaptation and mitigation practices by the state and non-state actors across diverse scales.

Climate change presents significant challenges for South Asia, some of the most critical issues area includes, the melting of Himalayan glaciers, increased frequency of flood and droughts, the problem of drinking water and large scale displacements and human migration increasing flooding of settlements and infrastructure, heat related deaths and food and water shortages. The majority of South Asian countries are lower-middle income countries that already struggle to livelihood securities of their growing populations. The risk and uncertainties associated with climate change compel us to rethink and reimagining the notions of geographical dista