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Relationship between vitamin D and gestational diabetes in overweight or obese pregnant women may be mediated by adiponectin.

ABSTRACT

Maternal vitamin D deficiency has been implicated in adverse pregnancy outcomes. However, the association between vitamin D and inflammation, particularly adipokines, remains unexplored in pregnancy.In 102 overweight or obese pregnant women at high-risk of gestational diabetes (GDM), we investigated relationships between maternal 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations at 12-15 weeks gestation (baseline) and serum lipids, inflammatory markers, novel adipokines (omentin-1, visfatin, high molecular weight (HMW)-adiponectin), and subsequent pregnancy outcomes (GDM, preeclampsia, preterm birth PTB]). After adjustment for maternal factors (age, BMI, parity, ethnicity, and smoking status), baseline 25(OH)D concentrations were inversely associated with total cholesterol and triglycerides, and positively associated with HMW-adiponectin. Higher baseline 25(OH)D concentrations were associated with decreased fasting and 1-hour post-OGTT glucose and reduced risk of GDM at 26-28 weeks, as well as with longer gestation and reduced risk of PTB upon additional adjustment for caesarean section. Adding HMW-adiponectin to the multivariable models attenuated most associations, and HMW-adiponectin was a significant predictor in the models.Our findings suggest that lower maternal 25(OH)D concentrations in overweight/obese pregnant women at high-risk of GDM are associated with increased cardiometabolic risks during pregnancy and adverse pregnancy outcomes, and that these associations may be mediated by HMW-adiponectin. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.