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Viewing Time and Self-Report Measures of Sexual Attraction in Samoan Cisgender and Transgender Androphilic Males.

Research paper by Lanna J LJ Petterson, Barnaby J BJ Dixson, Anthony C AC Little, Paul L PL Vasey

Indexed on: 18 Jul '18Published on: 18 Jul '18Published in: Archives of Sexual Behavior



Abstract

Across cultures, androphilic males (natal males who are predominantly sexually attracted to adult men, not women) tend to present in one of two forms: cisgender or transgender. Previous research has shown that, although their gender presentation and identities are distinct, the two forms are similar in many other ways. The present study examined whether cisgender and transgender androphilic males exhibit a similar pattern of self-reported sexual attraction and viewing time response to images of men and women, and one that is directly inverse to that of cisgender gynephilic males (natal males who are predominately sexually attracted to adult women, not men). Using measures of self-reported sexual attraction and viewing time, we compared the response patterns of Samoan cisgender males who self-identified as men, were predominantly attracted to men, and had sex only with men (N = 16) and Samoan transgender males who self-identified as fa'afafine, were predominantly attracted to men, and had sex only with men (N = 30). Samoan cisgender males who self-identified as men, were predominantly attracted to women, and had sex only with women (N = 31) served as a comparison group. Androphilic men and fa'afafine reported greater sexual attraction to men than women and viewed the images of men longer than those of women. Gynephilic men showed the inverse pattern. Viewing time discrepancies between participant's preferred gender and their non-preferred gender were greater for gynephilic men compared to the two androphilic groups. The implications of these preliminary findings for the use of viewing time measures of male sexual orientation across different cultural contexts are discussed.