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Three-dimensional image reconstruction with free open-source OsiriX software in video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy and segmentectomy.

Research paper by Fei F Yao, Jian J Wang, Ju J Yao, Fangrong F Hang, Xu X Lei, Yongke Y Cao

Indexed on: 25 Jan '17Published on: 25 Jan '17Published in: International Journal of Surgery



Abstract

The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the practice and the feasibility of Osirix, a free and open-source medical imaging software, in performing accurate video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy and segmentectomy.From July 2014 to April 2016, 63 patients received anatomical video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS), either lobectomy or segmentectomy, in our department. Three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction images of 61 (96.8%) patients were preoperatively obtained with contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT). Preoperative resection simulations were accomplished with patient-individual reconstructed 3D images. For lobectomy, pulmonary lobar veins, arteries and bronchi were identified meticulously by carefully reviewing the 3D images on the display. For segmentectomy, the intrasegmental veins in the affected segment for division and the intersegmental veins to be preserved were identified on the 3D images. Patient preoperative characteristics, surgical outcomes and postoperative data were reviewed from a prospective database.The study cohort of 63 patients included 33 (52.4%) men and 30 (47.6%) women, of whom 46 (73.0%) underwent VATS lobectomy and 17 (37.0%) underwent VATS segmentectomy. There was 1 conversion from VATS lobectomy to open thoracotomy because of fibrocalcified lymph nodes. A VATS lobectomy was performed in 1 case after completing the segmentectomy because invasive adenocarcinoma was detected by intraoperative frozen-section analysis. There were no 30-day or 90-day operative mortalities CONCLUSIONS: The free, simple, and user-friendly software program Osirix can provide a 3D anatomic structure of pulmonary vessels and a clear vision into the space between the lesion and adjacent tissues, which allows surgeons to make preoperative simulations and improve the accuracy and safety of actual surgery.