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The Role of Stem Cells in Wound Angiogenesis.

Research paper by Alice A King, Swathi S Balaji, Sundeep G SG Keswani, Timothy M TM Crombleholme

Indexed on: 11 Oct '14Published on: 11 Oct '14Published in: Advances in wound care



Abstract

Significance: Revascularization plays a critical role in wound healing and is regulated by a complex milieu of growth factors and cytokines. Deficiencies in revascularization contribute to the development of chronic nonhealing wounds. Recent Advances: Stem-cell-based therapy provides a novel strategy to enhance angiogenesis and improve wound healing. With bioethical concerns associated with embryonic stem cells, focus has shifted to different populations of vascular precursors, isolated from adult somatic tissue. Three main populations have been identified: endothelial progenitor cells, mesenchymal stem cells, and induced-pluripotent stem cells. These populations demonstrate great promise to positively influence neovascularization and wound repair. Critical Issues: Further studies to more definitively define each population are necessary to efficiently translate stem-cell-based therapeutic angiogenesis to the bedside. Better understanding of the physiologic pathways of how stem cells contribute to angiogenesis in normal tissue repair will help identify targets for successful therapeutic angiogenesis. Future Directions: Active studies in both animal models and clinical trials are being conducted to develop effective delivery routes, including dosing, route, and timing. Stem-cell-based therapy holds significant potential as a strategy for therapeutic angiogenesis in the care of patients with chronic nonhealing wounds.