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The relationship between sleep and drug use characteristics in participants with cocaine or methamphetamine use disorders.

Research paper by James J JJ Mahoney, Richard R De La Garza, Brian J BJ Jackson, Christopher D CD Verrico, Allyson A Ho, Tabish T Iqbal, Thomas F TF Newton

Indexed on: 22 Jun '14Published on: 22 Jun '14Published in: Psychiatry Research



Abstract

The goal of this project was to evaluate the relationship between self-reported sleep habits, daytime sleepiness, and drug use variables in individuals with cocaine and methamphetamine (METH) use disorders. Participants with a cocaine or meth use disorder completed questionnaires, including the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), and a demographic/drug use form. Participants with a cocaine (N=51) or meth use disorder (N=85) were separated into those with either high or low sleep deficits. In participants with a cocaine use disorder, ANOVA revealed significantly higher ESS scores among those defined as "poor sleepers" (with a PSQI score >5) when compared to those defined as "good sleepers" (with a PSQI score ≤5). In addition, poor sleepers reported using cocaine for more days out of the past 30 when compared to good sleepers. Interestingly, good sleepers reported using more grams of cocaine/day compared to poor sleepers. In participants with a METH use disorder, ANOVA revealed significantly higher ESS scores among poor sleepers when compared to good sleepers. Finally, individuals with a METH use disorder that endorsed elevated daytime sleepiness also had significantly higher PSQI scores when compared to those with normal daytime sleepiness. The results indicate that drug use variables, such as recent and daily use, may affect sleep quality and daytime sleepiness in individuals with stimulant use disorders; however, further investigations (i.e. in cocaine and METH users that do not meet criteria for a cocaine or METH use disorder) must be conducted in order to provide more conclusive evidence of the impact these usage variables may have on these sleep characteristics.