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The mitochondrial genomes of twelve Anopheles mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) and their phylogenetic implications

Research paper by Xiao-;Yi Peng, Pei Zhou; Xiao-;Yu Duan; Zeng-;Qiang Qian

Indexed on: 13 Aug '16Published on: 28 Jun '16Published in: Conservation genetics resources



Abstract

Abstract Anopheles mosquitoes are obligatory vectors for malaria, and their accurate identification is crucial for implementing biological control and malaria prevention. Mitochondrial DNA markers have proven powerful for such purposes. In this study, ten complete and two partial mitochondrial genomes were assembled for a total of 12 Anopheles mosquitoes. The ten complete genomes range in size from 15,322 to 15,458 bp, and the two partial genomes are 14,967 and 15,155 bp long, respectively. They all encode the same typical set of 37 mitochondrial genes (i.e. 13 PCGs, 22 tRNAs and two rRNAs) and one control region. Their genomic sizes, base compositions, codon usage, gene contents and organizations are mutually similar as well as similar to those of their congeners. Phylogenetic analysis suggested the placement of A. atroparvus and A. quadrimaculatus (both belonging to the subgenus Anopheles) within the major clade corresponding to the subgenus Cellia, which deserves further investigations.Abstract Anopheles mosquitoes are obligatory vectors for malaria, and their accurate identification is crucial for implementing biological control and malaria prevention. Mitochondrial DNA markers have proven powerful for such purposes. In this study, ten complete and two partial mitochondrial genomes were assembled for a total of 12 Anopheles mosquitoes. The ten complete genomes range in size from 15,322 to 15,458 bp, and the two partial genomes are 14,967 and 15,155 bp long, respectively. They all encode the same typical set of 37 mitochondrial genes (i.e. 13 PCGs, 22 tRNAs and two rRNAs) and one control region. Their genomic sizes, base compositions, codon usage, gene contents and organizations are mutually similar as well as similar to those of their congeners. Phylogenetic analysis suggested the placement of A. atroparvus and A. quadrimaculatus (both belonging to the subgenus Anopheles) within the major clade corresponding to the subgenus Cellia, which deserves further investigations.AnophelesAnophelesA.atroparvusA.quadrimaculatusAnophelesCellia