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The effects of constant and diel-fluctuating temperature acclimation on the thermal tolerance, swimming capacity, specific dynamic action and growth performance of juvenile Chinese bream.

Research paper by Jing J Peng, Zhen-Dong ZD Cao, Shi-Jian SJ Fu

Indexed on: 16 Jul '14Published on: 16 Jul '14Published in: Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology - Part A: Molecular & Integrative Physiology



Abstract

We investigated the effects of constant and diel-fluctuating temperature acclimation on the thermal tolerance, swimming capacity, specific dynamic action (SDA) and growth performance of juvenile Chinese bream (Parabramis pekinensis). The critical thermal maxima (CTmax), critical thermal minima (CTmin), lethal thermal maxima (LTmax), lethal thermal minima (LTmin), critical swimming speed (Ucrit) and fast-start escape response after 30 d acclimation to three constant temperatures (15, 20 and 25 °C) and one diel-fluctuating temperature (20±5 °C) were measured. In addition, feeding rate (FR), feeding efficiency (FE) and specific growth rate (SGR) were measured. The diel-fluctuating temperature group showed lower CTmin than the 20 °C group but a similar CTmax, indicating a wider thermal scope. SDA linearly increased with the temperature. Temperature variation between 20 and 25 °C had little effect on either swimming or growth performance. However, fish in the 15 °C group exhibited much poorer swimming and growth performance than those in the 20 °C group. Ucrit decreased slightly under low acclimation temperature due to the pronounced improvement in swimming efficiency under cold temperature. Fish in the diel-fluctuating temperature group fed more but exhibited similar SGR compared to 20 °C group, possibly due in part to an increase in energy expenditure to cope with the temperature fluctuation. The narrower thermal scope and lower CTmax of Chinese bream together with the conservation of CTmax with temperature acclimation, suggests that local water temperature elevations may have more profound effects on Chinese bream than on other fish species in the Three Gorges Reservoir.