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The effects of a lupin-enriched diet on oxidative stress and factors influencing vascular function in overweight subjects.

Research paper by Xingbin X Yang, Kevin D KD Croft, Ya P YP Lee, Trevor A TA Mori, Ian B IB Puddey, Sofia S Sipsas, Anne A Barden, Ewald E Swinny, Jonathan M JM Hodgson

Indexed on: 11 Mar '10Published on: 11 Mar '10Published in: Antioxidants & redox signaling



Abstract

A diet enriched in lupin kernel flour can lower blood pressure, but mechanisms responsible are unclear. Lupin is a source of polyphenols, protein, and L-arginine, factors that may influence blood pressure via effects on oxidative stress and vascular function. Therefore, we aimed to determine the effects of a lupin-enriched diet on oxidative stress and factors influencing vascular function as potential mechanisms for demonstrated benefits on blood pressure. Overweight men and women (n = 88) were recruited to a 16-week parallel-design study. Participants were randomly assigned to replace 15%-20% of their usual daily energy intake with white bread (control) or lupin kernel flour-enriched bread (lupin). All measurements were taken at baseline and 16 weeks. At baseline, plasma F₂-isoprostanes and 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) were positively associated with blood pressure, and plasma nitrite was negatively associated with blood pressure (p < 0.05). For lupin relative to control, the estimated differences in plasma F₂-isoprostanes (45 pmol/L; 95%CI: -68, 158), urinary F₂-isoprostanes (17 pmol/mmol creatinine; 95%CI: -43, 76), plasma 20-HETE (75 pmol/L; 95%CI: -91, 241), and plasma nitrite (-0.3 μmol/L; 95%CI: -1.1, 0.4) were not significant. Although regular consumption of lupin-enriched bread can lower blood pressure, these results do not support for the hypothesis that this is via effects on oxidative stress or vascular function.