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The effect of ambient exposure to PM2.5 on the transfusion usage of blood components and adverse transfusion reactions in the haze weather.

Research paper by Chih-Chun CC Chang, Hui-Jung HJ Lin, Jen-Tang JT Sun, Pei-Yu PY Li, Tai-Chen TC Lee, Ming-Jang MJ Su, Tzung-Hai TH Yen, Fang-Yeh FY Chu

Indexed on: 26 Sep '16Published on: 26 Sep '16Published in: Transfusion and Apheresis Science



Abstract

Accumulating evidence has shown that ambient exposure to PM2.5, especially in the haze weather, increased the risk of various diseases. However, the association of air pollution status with blood transfusion utilization and the prevalence and severity of adverse transfusion reactions remain to be clarified.The data of monthly transfusion usage of blood components, adverse transfusion reactions, as well as PM2.5 and PM10 levels from 2013 to 2015 were obtained.During the study interval, both PM2.5 and PM10 levels were significantly increased in the haze weather when compared with the non-haze weather. The utilization of total blood components per patient-month in the haze weather was prone to be increased when compared with that in the non-haze weather (13.28 ± 1.66 vs. 12.33 ± 1.30, p = 0.068). The usage of RBC products per patient-month in the haze weather was significantly increased when compared with that in the non-haze weather (4.39 ± 0.39 vs. 4.07 ± 0.30, p = 0.009). There was no obvious difference between the haze and non-haze weathers for the usage of platelet and plasma products per patient-month. Besides, no definite differences of the prevalence and severity of transfusion-associated adverse reaction were observed between the haze and non-haze weathers.Our study first indicated that transfusion utilization, particularly the RBC products, was significantly increased in the haze weather when compared with that in the non-haze weather. There was no obvious association of air pollution with the prevalence and severity of adverse transfusion reactions and further research is required.