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The Brazilian Community Mental Health Care Services: Social Inclusion and Psychosocial Rehabilitation

Research paper by Mariana Moraes Salles, Sônia Barros; Thelma Simões Matsukura

Indexed on: 30 Nov '16Published on: 07 Nov '16Published in: Journal of Psychosocial Rehabilitation and Mental Health



Abstract

Abstract A series of transformations have occurred in Brazilian mental health services, for which psychosocial care centres (CAPS) are a care device. This study aims to examine the potentials and limitations of this Brazilian service model for promoting the social inclusion of people with mental health problems. A qualitative research methodology was used. A semi-structured interview was developed and then carried out with 29 service users and people in their social network. Discourse analysis was used for data comprehension. Besides the participation and interaction provided by CAPS, many service users had no other social options. Nonetheless, CAPS are a good starting point for social integration, offering new options for the everyday life for people with mental health problems. However, other health services and society as a whole must participate in this process, creating a context more favourable for the social inclusion of people with mental health problems.AbstractA series of transformations have occurred in Brazilian mental health services, for which psychosocial care centres (CAPS) are a care device. This study aims to examine the potentials and limitations of this Brazilian service model for promoting the social inclusion of people with mental health problems. A qualitative research methodology was used. A semi-structured interview was developed and then carried out with 29 service users and people in their social network. Discourse analysis was used for data comprehension. Besides the participation and interaction provided by CAPS, many service users had no other social options. Nonetheless, CAPS are a good starting point for social integration, offering new options for the everyday life for people with mental health problems. However, other health services and society as a whole must participate in this process, creating a context more favourable for the social inclusion of people with mental health problems.