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The Anne Frank Haven: A case of an alternative educational program in an integrative Kibbutz setting

Research paper by Miriam Ben-Peretz, Moshe Giladi, Yuval Dror

Indexed on: 01 Jan '92Published on: 01 Jan '92Published in: International Review of Education



Abstract

The essential features of the programme of the Anne Frank Haven are the complete integration of children from low SES and different cultural backgrounds with Kibbutz children; a holistic approach to education; and the involvement of the whole community in an “open” residential school. After 33 years, it is argued that the experiment has proved successful in absorbing city-born youth in the Kibbutz, enabling at-risk populations to reach significant academic achievements, and ensuring their continued participation in the dominant culture. The basic integration model consists of “layers” of concentric circles, in dynamic interaction. The innermost circle is the class, the learning community. The Kibbutz community and the foster parents form a supportive, enveloping circle, which enables students to become part of the outer community and to intervene in it. A kind of meta-environment, the inter-Kibbutz partnership and the Israeli educational system, influence the program through decision making and guidance. Some of the principles of the Haven — integration, community involvement, a year's induction for all new students, and open residential settings — could be useful for cultures and societies outside the Kibbutz. The real “secret” of success of an alternative educational program is the dedicated, motivated and highly trained staff.