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Surgical management of acute complications and critical restenosis following carotid artery stenting.

Research paper by Erik L EL Owens, Norman H NH Kumins, John J JJ Bergan, Steve R SR Sparks

Indexed on: 25 Apr '02Published on: 25 Apr '02Published in: Annals of Vascular Surgery



Abstract

Carotid artery angioplasty with stenting (CAS) is being increasingly used in the treatment of extracranial carotid artery stenosis. As in other catheter-based approaches to the treatment of arterial disease, surgical intervention may be required because of either acute complications or correct critical restenosis. We have reviewed our experience managing early complications and critical in-stent restenoses after CAS in a tertiary care university hospital and a Veterans Affairs Medical Center. During the last 5 years, 22 carotid arteries (21 patients) underwent CAS. One patient developed thrombosis and rupture of the carotid artery during stenting. Two other patients (3 arteries) developed critical restenosis within 12 months. Subsequent surgical reconstructions included an internal carotid artery (ICA)-to-external carotid artery (ECA) transposition and a common carotid artery (CCA)-to-ICA bypass with reversed saphenous vein (RSV). The patient who underwent CCA-to-ICA bypass later required subclavian-to-ICA bypass because of rapidly progressive intimal hyperplasia and subsequent occlusion of the CCA. The other patient has not had surgical repair because of his deteriorating condition and significant co-morbidities. During the same time period, two additional patients were referred from outside institutions specifically for surgical intervention after carotid stenting. One had delayed rupture of the carotid artery 1 day after stenting and underwent urgent surgical repair. Another patient had early, critical restenosis within the stent and underwent placement of a CCA-to-ICA interposition graft using RSV. Acute treatment failures after CAS can be successfully managed using standard surgical techniques. Patients who develop critical in-stent restenosis requiring surgical repair may need more challenging surgical reconstructions to maintain cerebral perfusion.