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Surface morphology and electrocatalytic properties of nickel nanoparticles formed in track pores

Research paper by S. A. Ziganshina, A. P. Chuklanov; D. A. Biziaev; A. A. Bukharaev

Indexed on: 09 Nov '16Published on: 01 Sep '16Published in: Journal of Surface Investigation. X-ray, Synchrotron and Neutron Techniques



Abstract

Abstract Structures, each of which is composed of a conducting substrate with a protective dielectric layer containing an array of equal-sized pores formed under the action of high-energy ions and chemical etching, are created. The created pores are electrochemically filled with nickel nanoparticles. With atomic-force microscopy (AFM), it is established that Ni nanoparticles are generated exclusively within ion tracks without film formation on the surface of a silicon-dioxide layer. Histograms illustrating the nanoparticle-diameter distribution are constructed, and areas of the nickel nanoparticles are calculated. The electrochemical and electrocatalytic properties of Ni nanoparticles inherent to ethanol-oxidation reactions are investigated. The catalytic activity per unit area of the nanocatalyst is estimated using voltammograms, AFM data, and histograms characterizing the particle size distribution.AbstractStructures, each of which is composed of a conducting substrate with a protective dielectric layer containing an array of equal-sized pores formed under the action of high-energy ions and chemical etching, are created. The created pores are electrochemically filled with nickel nanoparticles. With atomic-force microscopy (AFM), it is established that Ni nanoparticles are generated exclusively within ion tracks without film formation on the surface of a silicon-dioxide layer. Histograms illustrating the nanoparticle-diameter distribution are constructed, and areas of the nickel nanoparticles are calculated. The electrochemical and electrocatalytic properties of Ni nanoparticles inherent to ethanol-oxidation reactions are investigated. The catalytic activity per unit area of the nanocatalyst is estimated using voltammograms, AFM data, and histograms characterizing the particle size distribution.