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Study of the diagnostic value of interleukin-6 and interleukin-8 in children with acute gastroenteritis.

Research paper by Maysaa El Sayed MES Zaki, Mona Abdel Latif MAL Alsayed, Raghdaa R Shrief

Indexed on: 11 Apr '20Published on: 11 Apr '20Published in: Germs



Abstract

Gastroenteritis in children is responsible for high morbidity and mortality. Our aim was to determine the serum and fecal levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) in children with acute gastroenteritis of viral and bacterial etiology to assess their utility as diagnostic biomarkers for these infections. In this case-control study, the children were classified according to the pathogen recovered from the stool by bacterial culture or by direct viral antigen detection by enzyme immunoassay (EIA) into 50 children with acute bacterial gastroenteritis and 50 children with acute viral gastroenteritis. In addition, 50 apparently healthy children were included as a control group. Blood and stool samples were subjected to detection of IL-6 and IL-8. There were statistically significant elevations of total leucocytes counts, absolute neutrophils count, C-reactive protein, serum IL-6 and serum IL-8 in children with gastroenteritis compared to healthy children (p<0.001). CRP, serum IL-6 and IL-8 had significantly elevated levels in children with bacterial gastroenteritis compared to viral gastroenteritis. Fecal IL-6 and IL-8 had significantly elevated levels in children with acute gastroenteritis than in healthy control (p<0.001). The area under the curve (AUC) showed that CRP and serum IL-6 could be used as discriminative markers for acute bacterial gastroenteritis in children, in comparison to serum IL-8. Elevated serum IL-6 and CRP can aid in differentiation between viral and bacterial gastroenteritis. Serum IL-8 had limited discrimination ability between viral and bacterial gastroenteritis. Stool levels of IL-6 and IL-8 were elevated in children with viral and bacterial gastroenteritis, however, their assessment by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay had technical limitations to be used as differentiation biomarkers. GERMS.