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Sonographically-guided 14-gauge core needle biopsy for papillary lesions of the breast.

Research paper by Eun Sook ES Ko, Nariya N Cho, Joo Hee JH Cha, Jeong Seon JS Park, Sun Mi SM Kim, Woo Kyung WK Moon

Indexed on: 08 Jun '07Published on: 08 Jun '07Published in: Korean journal of radiology



Abstract

We wanted to assess the need for surgical excising papillary lesions of the breast that were diagnosed upon sonographically guided 14-gauge core needle biopsy.Sixty-nine women (age range: 25-74 years, mean age: 51.7 years) with 69 papillary lesions (4.9%) were diagnosed and followed after performing sonographically guided 14-gauge core needle biopsies. Surgical excision was performed for 44 (64%) of 69 papillary lesions, and 25 lesions were followed with imaging studies (range: 6-46 months, mean: 17.9 months). The histologic findings upon core biopsy were compared with the surgical, imaging and follow-up findings.Core needle biopsies of 69 lesions yielded tissue that was classified as benign for 43 lesions, atypical for 18 lesions and malignant for eight lesions. Of the 43 lesions that yielded benign papilloma upon core needle biopsy, one had intraductal papillary carcinoma found upon surgery. An immediate surgical biopsy was recommended for this lesion because of the imaging-histologic discordance. No additional carcinoma was found during the imaging follow-up. Surgical excision was performed for 17 atypical papillary lesions, and this revealed intraductal (n = 6) or invasive (n = 2) papillary carcinoma in 8 (47%) lesions. Of the seven intraductal papillary carcinomas, surgery revealed invasive papillary carcinoma in one (14%).Our results suggest that papillary lesions of the breast that are diagnosed as benign upon sonographically guided 14-gauge core needle biopsy can be followed when the results are concordant with the imaging findings.