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Similarity in the metabolic profile in macroscopically involved and un-involved colonic mucosa in patients with inflammatory bowel disease: an in vitro proton ((1)H) MR spectroscopy study.

Research paper by Uma U Sharma, Rajiv R RR Singh, Vineet V Ahuja, Govind K GK Makharia, Naranamangalam R NR Jagannathan

Indexed on: 27 Apr '10Published on: 27 Apr '10Published in: Magnetic Resonance Imaging



Abstract

The histological extent of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is greater than that evident by colonoscopic evaluation. We hypothesized that metabolic profile in macroscopically un-involved colonic mucosa in IBD is similar to that of controls with healthy colon. We thus assessed the differences in metabolic profile in macroscopically involved and un-involved colonic mucosa of IBD patients to further substantiate the extent of disease.Colonic mucosal biopsies were obtained and snap frozen from both the macroscopically un-involved and involved colonic mucosa of IBD patients and macroscopically normal colonic mucosa of controls and were subjected to in-vitro high-resolution proton ((1)H) magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy and the concentrations of metabolites were determined.Thirty-two metabolites were assigned in the proton MR spectrum of colonic mucosa of IBD patients. The concentrations of amino acids (isoleucine, leucine, valine, arginine, lysine, glutamine/glutamate, alanine), membrane metabolites (choline, glycerophosphorylcholine/phosphorylcholine), glycolytic product (lactate) and short chain fatty acid (formate) were significantly lower while significantly high level of glucose were observed in the macroscopically un-involved colonic mucosa of IBD patients compared to the macroscopically normal mucosa of controls. There was no significant difference in the concentrations of metabolites in macroscopically involved and un-involved colonic mucosa of IBD patients.The metabolic profile in macroscopically un-involved colonic mucosa of IBD patients is similar to that of macroscopically involved mucosa but different from colonic mucosa of controls. This suggests that even macroscopically un-involved colonic mucosa is metabolically abnormal and may explain the increase in extent of disease with time.