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Risk factors of hypertensive pregnancies in women with diabetes and the influence on their future life.

Research paper by Daniel D Gordin, Carol C Forsblom, Per-Henrik PH Groop, Kari K Teramo, Risto R Kaaja

Indexed on: 22 Jul '14Published on: 22 Jul '14Published in: Annals of medicine



Abstract

Diabetic women carry a 2-4 times increased risk of a hypertensive pregnancy compared to non-diabetic people. This risk is related to presence of diabetic nephropathy, but also poor glycaemic control. Efforts to improve glycaemic control have decreased perinatal morbidity and mortality related to diabetic nephropathy. Despite good glycaemic control, overt nephropathy is associated with a variety of pregnancy complications, such as fetal growth restriction and pre-eclampsia. General population studies show that women with a history of pre-eclampsia are more prone to develop cardiovascular disease later in life than women with a history of normotensive pregnancy. Furthermore, recent data regarding the long-term effects of hypertensive pregnancies on late diabetic complications indicate that these women should be followed and treatment should be started early. In this review we summarize data on risk factors and long-term effects of hypertensive pregnancies on late diabetic complications that may be of clinical relevance in the prevention of these complications.