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Relationship Between Microstructure and Corrosion Behavior of Cr12Ni3Co12Mo4W Ultra-High-Strength Martensitic Stainless Steel

Research paper by Hui-;Yan Li, Chao-;Fang Dong; Kui Xiao; Xiao-;Gang Li; Ping Zhong

Indexed on: 15 Sep '16Published on: 07 Sep '16Published in: Acta Metallurgica Sinica (English Letters)



Abstract

Abstract The effect of tempering temperature on the microstructure and corrosion behavior of Cr12Ni3Co12Mo4W ultra-high-strength martensitic stainless steel was investigated using transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and electrochemical tests. The microstructures of the ultra-high-strength martensitic stainless steel consisted of some retained austenite and lath/plant martensite with the carbides distributed within the matrix and at the grain boundaries. Tempering of the steel for 4 h at various temperatures resulted in various carbide grain sizes and different amounts of the retained austenite. The results showed that larger carbide grains led to diminished corrosion resistance, whereas larger amounts of the retained austenite resulted in improved corrosion resistance. The steels exhibited good corrosion resistance in 0.017 mol/L NaCl solution and exhibited pitting corrosion in 0.17 mol/L NaCl solution. The martensite and prior austenite crystal boundaries dissolved in solution with pH 1.AbstractThe effect of tempering temperature on the microstructure and corrosion behavior of Cr12Ni3Co12Mo4W ultra-high-strength martensitic stainless steel was investigated using transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and electrochemical tests. The microstructures of the ultra-high-strength martensitic stainless steel consisted of some retained austenite and lath/plant martensite with the carbides distributed within the matrix and at the grain boundaries. Tempering of the steel for 4 h at various temperatures resulted in various carbide grain sizes and different amounts of the retained austenite. The results showed that larger carbide grains led to diminished corrosion resistance, whereas larger amounts of the retained austenite resulted in improved corrosion resistance. The steels exhibited good corrosion resistance in 0.017 mol/L NaCl solution and exhibited pitting corrosion in 0.17 mol/L NaCl solution. The martensite and prior austenite crystal boundaries dissolved in solution with pH 1.