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Quadriceps foam rolling and rolling massage increases hip flexion and extension passive range-of-motion.

Research paper by Estêvão Rios ER Monteiro, Jefferson J da Silva Novaes, Mark Tyler MT Cavanaugh, Barbara J BJ Hoogenboom, James J Steele, Jakob L JL Vingren, Jakob J Škarabot

Indexed on: 01 Oct '19Published on: 30 Sep '19Published in: Journal of bodywork and movement therapies



Abstract

Increases in joint range-of-motion may be beneficial for improving performance and reducing injury risk. This study investigated the effects of different self-massage volumes and modalities on passive hip range-of-motion. Twenty-five recreationally resistance-trained men performed four experimental protocols using a counterbalanced, randomized, and within-subjects design; foam rolling (FR) or roller massage (RM) for 60 or 120-s. Passive hip flexion and extension range-of-motion were measured in a counterbalanced and randomized order via manual goniometry before self-massage (baseline) and immediately, 10-, 20-, and 30-min following each self-massage intervention. Following FR or RM of quadriceps, there was an increase in hip flexion range-of-motion at Post-0 (FR: Δ = 19.28°; RM: Δ = 14.96°), Post-10 (FR: Δ = 13.03°; RM: Δ = 10.40°), and Post-20 (FR: Δ = 6.00°; RM: Δ = 4.64°) for all protocols, but these did not exceed the minimum detectable change at Post-10 for RM60 and RM120, and Post-20 for FR60, FR120, RM60, and RM120. Similarly, hip extension range-of-motion increased at Post-0 (FR: Δ = 8.56°; RM: Δ = 6.56°), Post-10 (FR: Δ = 4.64°; RM: Δ = 3.92°), and Post-20 (FR: Δ = 2.80°; RM: Δ = 1.92°), but did not exceed the minimum detectable change at Post-10 for FR60, RM60, and RM120, and Post-20 for FR60, FR120, RM60, and RM120. In conclusion, both FR and RM increased hip range-of-motion but larger volumes (120- vs. 60-second) and FR produced the greatest increases. These findings have implications for self-massage prescription and implementation, in both rehabilitation and athletic populations. Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.