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Prevalence of Self-Perceived Snoring and Apnea and Their Association with Daytime Sleepiness in Korean High School Students.

Research paper by Kwang Ik KI Yang, Jee Hyun JH Kim, Young Y Hwangbo, Dae Lim DL Koo, Daeyoung D Kim, Kyoung Jin KJ Hwang, Seung Bong SB Hong

Indexed on: 28 Jul '17Published on: 28 Jul '17Published in: Journal of clinical neurology (Seoul, Korea)



Abstract

There has been no nationwide population-based study of the prevalence of self-perceived snoring/apnea in Korean adolescents. The purpose of this study was to estimate prevalence of self-perceived snoring/apnea in Korean high-school students and to evaluate their association with daytime sleepiness.An online survey was used to investigate 12,672 students at 75 high schools across the 15 nationwide districts of South Korea. The variables were obtained using a self-reported questionnaire. The students answered questions about self-perceived snoring/apnea during the past 30 days. Daytime sleepiness was measured using a validated Korean version of the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, which was modified for adolescents. Covariates were the sex, school grade, frequency of self-perceived snoring/apnea, body mass index, sleep duration during a school day, and subjective perception of sleep duration.The prevalence of self-perceived snoring/apnea was 22.8% (26.4% for males vs. 18.8% for females, p<0.001) and 9.2% (10.5% for males vs. 7.7% for females, p<0.001). Obesity was significantly associated with self-perceived snoring [odds ratio (OR)=2.18, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.94-2.46] and apnea (OR=1.57, 95% CI=1.33-1.86). Multivariate analysis showed that any frequency of self-perceived snoring/apnea was significantly associated with excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS). The OR of EDS increased significantly with the frequency of snoring and apnea. Female, sleep duration of <5 hours during a school day, and subjective perceptions of insufficient and considerable sleep durations were also significantly associated with EDS.The prevalence of self-perceived snoring/apnea was significantly higher in students who were male and obese. Students with self-perceived snoring/apnea exhibited more significant EDS and an increased risk of EDS as the frequency of snoring and apnea increased.