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Preoperative neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio predicts death among patients with localized clear cell renal carcinoma undergoing nephrectomy.

Research paper by Boyd R BR Viers, Robert R Houston Thompson, Stephen A SA Boorjian, Christine M CM Lohse, Bradley C BC Leibovich, Matthew K MK Tollefson

Indexed on: 16 Jul '14Published on: 16 Jul '14Published in: Urologic Oncology: Seminars and Original Investigations



Abstract

The neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) is an indicator of the systemic inflammatory response. An increased pretreatment NLR has been associated with adverse outcomes in other malignancies, but its role in localized (M0) clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) remains unclear. As such, we evaluated the ability of preoperative NLR to predict oncologic outcomes in patients with M0 ccRCC undergoing radical nephrectomy (RN).From 1995 to 2008, 952 patients underwent RN for M0 ccRCC. Of these, 827 (87%) had pretreatment NLR collected within 90 days before RN. Metastasis-free, cancer-specific, and overall survival was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using the log-rank test. Multivariate models were used to analyze the association of NLR with clinicopathologic outcomes.At a median follow-up of 9.3 years, 302, 233, and 436 patients had distant metastasis, death from ccRCC, and all-cause mortality, respectively. Higher NLR was associated with larger tumor size, higher nuclear grade, histologic tumor necrosis, and sarcomatoid differentiation (all, P < 0.001). A NLR ≥ 4.0 was significantly associated with worse 5-year cancer-specific (66% vs. 85%) and overall survival (66% vs. 85%). Finally, after controlling for clinicopathologic features, NLR remained independently associated with risks of death from ccRCC and all-cause mortality (hazard ratio for 1-unit increase: 1.02, P < 0.01).Our results suggest that NLR is independently associated with increased risks of cancer-specific and all-cause mortality among patients with M0 ccRCC undergoing RN. Accordingly, NLR, an easily obtained marker of biologically aggressive ccRCC, may be useful in preoperative patient risk stratification.

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