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Pregnancy outcome after emergency uterine artery embolisation for management of intractable haemorrhage associated with laparoscopic-assisted myomectomy.

Research paper by Akihiro A Takeda, Wataru W Koike, Shiori S Tsuge, Mayu M Shibata, Sanae S Shinone, Hiromi H Nakamura

Indexed on: 09 Feb '20Published on: 07 Feb '20Published in: Journal of obstetrics and gynaecology : the journal of the Institute of Obstetrics and Gynaecology



Abstract

The feasibility of emergency uterine artery embolisation (UAE) after diagnosis by three-dimensional computed tomographic angiography (CTA) for conservative management of intractable haemorrhage associated with laparoscopic-assisted myomectomy (LAM) was evaluated. In 764 women undergoing LAM, 12 cases were managed by emergency UAE to achieve haemostasis after evaluation by CTA. In two cases, bleeding was diagnosed in the postoperative period, while, in another 10 cases, bleeding was identified at the near-end stage of the surgical procedure. Uterine preservation was achieved in all cases. Among five women desiring child bearing, five spontaneous conceptions and one conception by assisted reproductive technology occurred. Five pregnancies resulted in live birth by caesarean section. Emergency UAE could be a useful minimally invasive option for the salvage of intractable haemorrhage associated with LAM to avoid exploratory laparotomy and/or hysterectomy. In women with fertility wish, pregnancy outcomes were favourable with high number of spontaneous pregnancy rate and without significant negative effects.Impact statement Uterine myoma is the most common benign pelvic tumour in women. Myomectomy is indicated as the primary intervention for women with symptomatic myoma, who are of reproductive age and desire uterine preservation, since it can significantly improve symptoms and quality of life and, in some clinical situations, improve reproductive outcomes. Intractable haemorrhage associated with any forms of myomectomy is a potentially life-threatening condition with potential loss of future fertility. However, clear consensus on its management are not well known so far. Emergency uterine artery embolisation after diagnosis by three-dimensional computed tomographic angiography has been effective in preserving the uterus with avoidance of laparotomy and/or life-saving hysterectomy as a salvage therapy for intractable haemorrhage associated with laparoscopic-assisted myomectomy. Significant adverse outcomes were not observed. Furthermore, in women desiring child bearing, a high rate of spontaneous conceptions with live birth by caesarean section was achieved after these combined interventions. Endovascular embolisation could be considered as a minimally invasive alternative with favourable pregnancy outcome to treat intractable haemorrhage associated with myomectomy.