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Operative time and outcome of enhanced recovery after surgery after laparoscopic colorectal surgery.

Research paper by Oliver J OJ Harrison, Neil J NJ Smart, Paul P White, Adela A Brigic, Elinor R ER Carlisle, Andrew S AS Allison, Jonathan B JB Ockrim, Nader K NK Francis

Indexed on: 25 Jun '14Published on: 25 Jun '14Published in: JSLS : Journal of the Society of Laparoendoscopic Surgeons / Society of Laparoendoscopic Surgeons



Abstract

Combining laparoscopy and enhanced recovery provides benefit to short-term outcomes after colorectal surgery. Advances in training and techniques have allowed surgeons to operate on cases that are technically challenging and associated with prolonged operative time. Laparoscopic techniques improve the outcome of enhanced recovery after colorectal surgery; however, there are no specifications on the effect of prolonged operations on the outcome. The objective was to elucidate the impact of prolonged surgery and blood loss on the outcome of enhanced recovery after surgery after laparoscopic colorectal surgery.Four-hundred patients who underwent elective colorectal resection on enhanced recovery after surgery in Yeovil District Hospital between 2002 and 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. Delayed discharge was defined as a prolonged length of stay beyond the mean in this series (≥8 days).Three-hundred eighty-five patients were included. Median operative time was 180 minutes with a median blood loss of 100 mL. Conversion was not associated with a prolonged length of stay. Operative time and blood loss correlated with length of stay in a stepwise fashion. There were 2 cutoff points of operative time at 160 minutes and 300 minutes (5 hours), where risk of prolonged stay increased significantly (odds ratio [OR] 2.02; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05-3.90; P = .027), and blood loss of >500 mL (OR 3.114; 95% CI, 1.501-6.462, P = .002).Total operative timing impacts negatively on the outcome of enhanced recovery after laparoscopic colorectal resections with increased risk of delayed discharge seen after ∼2.5 hours and 5-hour duration.