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Methods, systems, and computer readable media for providing home subscriber server (HSS) proxy

Imported: 17 Feb '17 | Published: 28 Apr '15

USPTO - Utility Patents

Abstract

Methods, systems, and computer readable media for providing a home subscriber server (HSS) proxy are disclosed. According to one aspect, the subject matter described herein includes a method for providing a home subscriber server proxy. The method includes, at a node separate from a home subscriber server in a telecommunications network, receiving, from a requesting network entity, a request for information maintained at a home subscriber server, the information being associated with a subscriber, and, in response to receiving the request for information maintained at a home subscriber server, providing the information associated with the subscriber to the requesting network entity on behalf of the home subscriber server.

Description

PRIORITY CLAIM

This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 61/163,435, filed Mar. 25, 2009; the disclosure of which is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety.

TECHNICAL FIELD

The subject matter described herein relates to methods and systems for managing mobile subscribers in a wireless telecommunications network. More particularly, the subject matter described herein relates to systems, methods, and computer readable media for providing a home subscriber server (HSS) proxy.

BACKGROUND

In telecommunications networks that support mobile subscribers, there is a need to know or determine the current location of mobile subscribers so that calls, emails, short message service messages, or other data may be communicated to those mobile subscribers. In mobile telephone networks, there are network entities, usually servers, which maintain that information. These network entities may receive queries for the current location of a particular mobile subscriber, and may reply with the current or last known location of the mobile subscriber. The location is typically given in the form of the network address or ID of a switch, such as a mobile switching center (MSC), that is currently serving the mobile subscriber.

In second-generation (2G) telecommunications networks, the entity that manages this information is called a home location register, or HLR. In third-generation (3G) telecommunications networks, the entity that manages this information is called a home subscriber server, or HSS. Networks that use the session initiation protocol (SIP), such as Internet protocol multimedia subsystem (IMS) networks, also include an HSS.

FIG. 1 is a block diagram illustrating an IMS network. Network 100 includes an interrogation call session control function node, I-CSCF 102, which processes SIP messages and routes subscriber-related messages to the correct serving call session control function node, or S-CSCF. Network 100 has four S-CSCF nodes, 104A, 104B, 104C, and 104D, which hereinafter may be collectively referred to as S-CSCFs 104. Each S-CSCF 104 serves a subset of the subscribers within network 100. S-CSCFs 104 provide services for the subscribers, such as setting up media communication sessions between subscribers and applications.

Network 100 also includes an HSS 106, which contains subscription-related information, such as user profiles, performs authentication and authorization of subscribers, and can provide information about the physical location of the subscriber.

In the network illustrated in FIG. 1, I-CSCF 102 receives a SIP INVITE message 108. SIP INVITE message 108 may request a communication session with a particular subscriber, herein referred to as the called party, or CDP. To determine the current location of called party subscriber CDP, I-CSCF 102 queries HSS 106 by sending a Diameter protocol location information request (LIR) 110. HSS 106 responds with a Diameter location information answer (LIA) 112, which identifies the switch that is currently serving called party subscriber CDP. In the example illustrated in FIG. 1, HSS 106 may indicate to I-CSCF 102 that called party subscriber CDP is currently served by S-CSCF 104C, in which case I-CSCF 102 will forward the SIP INVITE message to S-CSCF 104C, shown as SIP INVITE message 114.

As the number of subscribers in a network increase, however, it may be necessary to distribute the HSS functions across more than one HSS node. FIG. 2 shows an example of such a network configuration.

FIG. 2 is a block diagram illustrating an IMS network having multiple HSS nodes. IMS network 200 includes an I-CSCF 202 for processing SIP messages and routing subscriber-related messages to the appropriate switch, such as S-CSCF nodes 204A and 204B, which hereinafter may be collectively referred to as switches 204 or C-CSCFs 204.

Network 200, however, includes multiple HSS nodes, HSS1 206A and HSS2 206B, which hereinafter may be collectively referred to as HSS nodes 206, across which is distributed subscriber information. In order for I-CSCF 202 to determine which HSS node 206 to query, network 200 includes a subscriber location function node (SLF) 208. In the network illustrated in FIG. 2, SLF 208 maintains an SLF table 210 for mapping subscribers to HSS nodes. SLF table 210 contains multiple rows, each row representing an entry in the table. Each entry maps a subscriber ID, shown in the left column of each row, to an HSS ID, shown in the right column of each row. In the example SLF table 210 illustrated in FIG. 2, a subscriber identified as “Fred@AOL.com” is mapped to HSS1 206A. Thus, if I-CSCF 202 needs to determine the location of Fred@AOL.com, it will first query SLF 208 to determine the appropriate HSS node 206, and then query the appropriate HSS node 206 to determine the identify of the switch that is serving Fred@AOL.com.

In the network illustrated in FIG. 2, I-CSCF 202 receives a SIP INVITE message 212 requesting a session with subscriber “Jenny@VZW.com”. To determine the current location of Jenny@VZW.com, I-CSCF 202 first queries SLF 208 to determine which HSS node 206 maintains location information for Jenny@VZW.com. I-CSCF 202 sends a Diameter location information request 214 to SLF 208, requesting location information for Jenny@VZW.com. SLF 208 responds with a Diameter redirect message 216, which instructs I-CSCF to redirect its LIR query to HSS2 206B. I-CSCF again issues a Diameter LIR query 218, this time to HSS2 206B, which issues a Diameter LIA response 220 back to I-CSCF 202. In the example illustrated in FIG. 2, HSS2 206B informs I-CSCF 202 that Jenny@VZW.com is being served by S-CSCF 204B. I-CSCF 202 forwards the SIP INVITE message, shown as SIP INVITE message 222, to S-CSCF 204B.

FIG. 3 is a block diagram illustrating an IMS network 300 having multiple HSS nodes. The functions of I-CSCF 202, S-CSCFs 204A and 204B, HSS nodes 206A and 206B, SLF 208, and SLF table 210 are essentially identical to their like-numbered counterparts in FIG. 2, and therefore descriptions of their functions will not be repeated here, with the exception of SLF 208. In network 300, SLF 208 does not redirect a Diameter LIR query but instead routes it to the appropriate HSS node 206 on behalf of I-CSCF 202.

Thus, in the network illustrated in FIG. 3, I-CSCF 202 receives a SIP INVITE message 302 requesting a session with subscriber “Jenny@VZW.com”. To determine the current location of Jenny@VZW.com, I-CSCF 202 first queries SLF 208 to determine which HSS node 206 maintains location information for Jenny@VZW.com. I-CSCF 202 sends a Diameter location information request 304 to SLF 208, requesting location information for Jenny@VZW.com. SLF 208 refers to SLF table 210 to determine that location information for Jenny@VZW.com is maintained at HSS2 2068, and sends or relays Diameter location information request 306 to HSS2 206B. HSS2 206B responds with a Diameter location information answer 308, which SLF 208 receives and forwards to I-CSCF 202. From Diameter location answer 208, I-CSCF 202 is informed that Jenny@VZW.com is being served by S-CSCF 204B. I-CSCF 202 forwards the SIP INVITE message, shown as SIP INVITE message 310, to S-CSCF 204B.

The networks illustrated in FIGS. 2 and 3, however, have no means to handle the situation where a mobile subscriber has been ported. FIG. 4 shows an example of a network that attempts to correct this disadvantage.

FIG. 4 is a block diagram illustrating another IMS network 400 having multiple HSS nodes. The functions of I-CSCF 202, S-CSCFs 204A and 204B, HSS node 206A, and SLF 208 are essentially identical to their like-numbered counterparts in FIG. 2, and therefore descriptions of their functions will not be repeated here, with the exception of SLF 208, which will be described in more detail below.

Network 400 includes a number portability database 402 for storing number portability information for subscribers. In the network illustrated in FIG. 4, I-CSCF 202 receives a SIP INVITE message 404 requesting a session with subscriber “9195551234”. To determine the current location of subscriber 9195551234, I-CSCF 202 sends a Diameter location information request 406 to SLF 208. SLF 208 may first check to see if subscriber 9195551234 has been assigned a new subscriber ID, by sending a subscriber ID map query (SMQ) 408 to, and receiving a subscriber ID map answer (SMA) 410 from, subscriber ID mapping database (SMDB) 402. If subscriber 9195551234 has been assigned a new subscriber ID, SMA 410 contains the new identifier allocated to subscriber 9195551234. SLF 208 then determines the HSS that serves the subscriber, and sends to I-CSCF 202 a Diameter redirect message 412 instructing I-CSCF 202 to redirect its Diameter location information request to an HSS node in the recipient network, such as HSS3 414.

In response to receiving Diameter redirect message 412, I-CSCF 202 issues Diameter location information request 416 to HSS3 414. HSS3 414 responds to I-CSCF 202 with a Diameter location information answer 418. From Diameter location information answer 418, I-CSCF 202 is instructed to forward the SIP INVITE message to a switch in the recipient network, SW_X 420. I-CSCF 202 forwards the SIP INVITE message, shown as SIP INVITE message 422, to recipient network switch SW_X 420.

There are disadvantages associated with the networks illustrated in FIGS. 1 through 4. Network 100 does not contain multiple HSS nodes. Network 200 contains multiple HSS nodes, but requires the I-CSCF to make two queries: one to determine the correct HSS node, and the second to get information from the correct HSS node. Network 300 allows the I-CSCF to make one query, but has no means to deal with ported subscribers. Network 400 checks for ported subscribers, but again forces the I-CSCF to make two queries: if the subscriber is ported, the SLF instructs the I-CSCF to ask another HSS for information.

Another issue involves technology migration, such as where a subscriber has migrated from one network standard or protocol to another network standard or protocol. For example, in mixed 2G/3G/SIP/IMS networks, what was formerly a 2G subscriber may upgrade to a 3G device or want to access the network using a SIP-capable terminal. This may happen because a subscriber has changed network service providers (and is also likely to be a number portability candidate), but this may also happen as a network provider supports more, different, or better telecommunications standards. In a technology migration scenario, a subscriber whose information was formerly maintained by an HLR, for example, may now have that information maintained at an HSS. The networks described above have no means to check for this scenario.

Accordingly, in light of these potential disadvantages, there exists a need for methods, systems, and computer readable media for providing a home subscriber server (HSS) proxy.

SUMMARY

Methods, systems, and computer readable media for providing a HSS proxy are disclosed. According to one aspect, the subject matter described herein includes a method for providing a home subscriber server proxy. The method includes, at a node separate from a home subscriber server in a telecommunications network, receiving, from a requesting network entity, a request for information maintained at a home subscriber server, the information being associated with a subscriber, and, in response to receiving the request for information maintained at a home subscriber server, providing the information associated with the subscriber to the requesting network entity on behalf of the home subscriber server.

According to yet another aspect, the subject matter described herein includes a system for providing a home subscriber server proxy. The system includes at least one database that includes number portability information, technology migration information, and information maintained at a home subscriber server; and a home subscriber server proxy node for receiving, from a requesting network entity, a request for information maintained at a home subscriber server, the information being associated with a subscriber, and, in response to receiving the request for information maintained at a home subscriber server, providing the information associated with the subscriber to the requesting network entity on behalf of the home subscriber server.

The subject matter described herein for providing a home subscriber server proxy may be implemented in hardware, software, firmware, or any combination thereof. As such, the terms “entity” or “module” as used herein refer to hardware for implementing the feature being described, and may additionally include software and/or firmware. In one exemplary implementation, the subject matter described herein may be implemented using a non-transitory computer readable medium having stored thereon computer executable instructions that when executed by the processor of a computer control the computer to perform steps. Exemplary computer readable media suitable for implementing the subject matter described herein include non-transitory computer-readable media, such as disk memory devices, chip memory devices, programmable logic devices, and application specific integrated circuits. In addition, a computer readable medium that implements the subject matter described herein may be located on a single device or computing platform or may be distributed across multiple devices or computing platforms.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

The subject matter described herein relates to methods, systems, and computer readable medium for providing an HSS proxy. Reference will now be made in detail to exemplary embodiments of the presently disclosed subject matter, examples of which are illustrated in the accompanying drawings. Wherever possible, the same reference numbers will be used throughout the drawings to refer to the same or like parts.

FIG. 5 is a block diagram illustrating an exemplary system for providing a home subscriber server proxy according to an embodiment of the subject matter described herein. Telecommunications network 500 includes a home subscriber server proxy, HSS proxy 502, for receiving, from a requesting network entity, a request for information maintained at a home subscriber server, the information being associated with a subscriber. In response to receiving the request for information maintained at a home subscriber server, HSS proxy 502 provides the information associated with the subscriber to the requesting network entity on behalf of the home subscriber server.

In one embodiment, providing the information associated with the subscriber to the requesting network entity on behalf of the home subscriber server may include determining whether the subscriber has been ported to a recipient network, and if so, responding to the requesting network entity with information identifying a switch that is associated with the recipient network.

In one embodiment, providing the information associated with the subscriber to the requesting network entity on behalf of the home subscriber server may include determining whether the subscriber has been migrated to a different technology, and if so, responding to the requesting network entity with information identifying a switch that is associated with the migrated-to technology.

In one embodiment, providing the information associated with the subscriber to the requesting network entity on behalf of the home subscriber server may include determining that the subscriber has not been ported to a recipient network or migrated to a different technology; in this instance, HSS proxy 502 may query a home subscriber server and send the result to the requesting network entity.

In the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 5, in response to receiving the subscriber location information request, HSS proxy 502 accesses one or more of a number portability database 504, a technology migration database 506, and a or location information database, such as home subscriber server (HSS) 508, to determine the subscriber location information, which HSS proxy 502 communicates to the entity that requested the location information.

HSS proxy 502 may receive subscriber location information requests from entities within network 500 that process signaling messages that are associated with a mobile subscriber. In the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 5, HSS proxy 502 may receive subscriber location information requests from a call session control function (CSCF) node, such as I-CSCF node 510. Example requests include Diameter protocol messages, such as the Diameter location information request (LIR).

HSS proxy 502 responds to the subscriber location information request by sending the subscriber location information to the requesting entity. Example responses include Diameter protocol messages, such as the Diameter location information answer (LIA). As will be described in more detail in FIGS. 10 and 11, below, other message protocols may be used.

The location information provided by HSS proxy 502 may include the address or other identifier, such as a location routing number (LRN), a point code address, a uniform resource identifier (URI), an Internet protocol address, etc., of a node in the network that is currently serving the mobile subscriber or to which call setup messages, such as SIP INVITE messages, should be directed for the purpose of setting up a call with the mobile subscriber. In the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 5, network 500 includes three switches, SW1 512A, SW2 512B, and SW3 512C.

In one embodiment, technology migration database 506 includes current technology registration information for dual mode subscribers and where HSS proxy 502 accesses the current technology registration information to determine a technology or network type (e.g., Internet protocol multimedia subsystem (IMS), long term evolution (LTE), global system for mobile communications (GSM), session initiation protocol (SIP), signaling system 7 (SS7), public switched telephone network (PSTN), etc.), for which the subscriber is currently registered.

In one embodiment, HSS proxy 502 and one or more of one or more of number portability database 504, technology migration database 506, and HSS 508 are components of a signal routing node, such as a SIP router.

In the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 5, HSS proxy 502 may perform separate queries to each of number portability database 504, technology migration database 506, and HSS 508 in order to get the information associated with the subscriber. In an alternative embodiment, the number portability information, the technology migration information, and the HSS location information may be present in the same database accessible by HSS proxy 502 in a single lookup. In one embodiment, HSS proxy 502 have access to a single database, referred to herein as a HSS proxy database, that includes all of the information necessary to process a Diameter query for which HSS or HLR access is required. Table 1, below illustrates an example of information that may be included in an HSS proxy database according to an embodiment of the subject matter described herein.

TABLE 1 Exemplary HSS Proxy Database HSS or LRN/ Current Directory In or Technology HLR Routing Technology Number Out Migration Address Digits Registration DN1 IN LTE IP1 Prefix1 DN2 IN 36-GSM PC1 Prefix2 DN3 Out LRN DN4 IN 3G-IS-41 PC2 Prefix3 DN5 IN 3G-GSM IP2, PC1 Prefix4 LTE and LTE

In Table 1, the first column contains directory numbers (DNs) that HSS proxy 502 may compare to directory numbers from received DIAMETER messages.

The second column in the table indicates whether the subscriber is an in-network subscriber or whether the subscriber has been ported out. As indicated by the third row in the table, if the subscriber has been ported out, the only remaining data in the table is the location routing number (LRN) that corresponds to the network to which the subscriber has been ported. If the subscriber is an in-network subscriber, technology migration, HSS or HLR address, routing digits, and current technology registration information may be present.

The third column in the table includes technology migration information, which indicates the type of handset that the subscriber is using. In the illustrated example, the technology types that are listed are long term evolution (LTE), 3G-GSM, 3G-IS-41, and 3G-GSM/LTE for a dual mode subscriber.

The fourth column in the table includes the HSS or HLR address for in-network subscribers. For LTE technology subscribers, the address will be an IP address or domain name of an HSS that is currently serving the subscriber. This information may be important because a network operator may have several HSSs in its network and thus the HSS proxy database may include the IP address of the particular HSS serving the subscriber.

The fifth column in the table includes LRNs for ported out subscribers and prefixes for in-network subscribers.

The sixth column of the table includes current technology registration information for dual mode subscribers. For example, in the last row of the table, the subscriber is a dual mode GSM/LTE subscriber and is currently registered as an LTE subscriber. It should also be noted that for this subscriber, there are two entries in the HSS or HLR address column, an IP address, IP2, for the HSS containing information for the subscriber's LTE registration and an HLR address point code1 (PC1) for the HLR containing the subscriber's 3G-GSM information. HSS proxy 502 would return either the point code or the IP address depending on whether the subscriber is currently registered as an LTE or GSM.

In one embodiment, HSS proxy 502 may perform the lookups or information accesses in the HSS proxy database in the following sequence:

    • 1. First, perform a number portability lookup, and if the subscriber is ported out, return the LRN without doing further lookups or checks for information.
    • 2. After the number portability lookup, perform the technology migration lookup to determine the current technology of the subscriber's handset.
    • 3. If dual mode registration is supported, perform the current technology registration lookup to determine the technology type for which the subscriber is currently registered.
    • 4. Perform the HSS or HLR address lookup to determine the address of the HSS or the HLR that contains the subscriber's information.

FIG. 6 is a flow chart illustrating an exemplary process for a home subscriber server proxy according to an embodiment of the subject matter described herein. This process will now be described in reference to FIGS. 5 and 6.

At block 600, a home subscriber server proxy node receives, from a requesting network entity, a request for subscriber information maintained at a home subscriber server, the information being associated with a subscriber. For example, in the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 5, HSS proxy 502 may receive a SIP INVITE from I-CSCF 510, where the SIP INVITE identifies a called party subscriber.

At block 602, in response to receiving the request for information maintained at a home subscriber server, the home subscriber server proxy node provides the information associated with the subscriber to the requesting network entity on behalf of the home subscriber server.

The operation of a network according to an embodiment of the subject matter described herein is described in FIGS. 7 through 9, which illustrate in detail exemplary signaling messages that are communicated among the various network elements. These messages are described below.

FIG. 7 is an exemplary call flow diagram illustrating signaling messages exchanged during an exemplary process for providing a home subscriber server proxy according to an embodiment of the subject matter described herein, where an IMS subscriber is not ported or migrated to a different technology. In FIG. 7, I-CSCF 510 receives a SIP INVITE message 700 that identifies a called party, CDP. I-CSCF 510 issues a Diameter location information request (LIR) message 702 to HSS proxy 502. LIR message 702 requests location information for subscriber CDP. HSS proxy 502 first determines whether the subscriber is in-network or out of network by sending a number portability query 704 to number portability database 504 and receiving number portability reply 706 indicating that the subscriber is not ported.

HSS proxy 502 then issues a technology migration query 708 to technology migration database 506 to determine whether the subscriber has been migrated to a different technology. In the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 7, technology migration database 506 sends a technology migration response 710 that indicates that the subscriber has not been migrated to a different technology.

HSS proxy 502 then issues LIR 712 to HSS 508. HSS 508 replies with LIA 714, which contains information identifying the switch that is currently serving the subscriber, e.g., SW1 512A. HSS proxy 502 communicates the identity of SW1 512A to the requesting network entity I-CSCF 510, e.g., via LIA 716. I-CSCF 510 uses this information and sends a SIP INVITE message 718 to the identified serving switch SW1 512A. In one embodiment, HSS proxy 502 terminates LIA response 714 and generates a new LIA message 716. In another embodiment, HSS proxy 502 receives the LIA response from HSS 508. In yet another embodiment, HSS 508 sends an LIA response directly to the requesting network entity, e.g., I-CSCF 510.

According to one aspect of the subject matter described herein, HSS proxy 502 may correlate between TCP connections used by I-CSCF 510 and SCTP associations used by HSS 508 (and other HSS nodes in the network.) For example, HSS proxy 502 may establish TCP connections with I-CSCFs with which it communicates and establish SCTP associations with HSSs with which it communicates. When a diameter query from an I-CSCF arrives on one of the TCP connections, and the subscriber is not ported and not migrated, HSS proxy 502 may identify the SCTP association associated with the destination HSS and forward the query to the HSS (or terminate the query and send a new query to the HSS). HSS proxy 502 may correlate the outbound SCTP association with the inbound TCP connection based on the path taken by the received diameter query. When the diameter response is received from the HSS over the SCTP association, HSS proxy 502 may send the response to over the inbound TCP connection that is correlated with the SCTP association using the stored correlation information.

FIG. 8 is an exemplary call flow diagram illustrating signaling messages exchanged during an exemplary process for providing a home subscriber server proxy according to an embodiment of the subject matter described herein, where an IMS subscriber is ported.

In FIG. 8, I-CSCF 510 receives a SIP INVITE message 800 that identifies a called party, CDP. I-CSCF 510 issues a Diameter location information request (LIR) message 802 to HSS proxy 502, requesting location information for subscriber CDP. HSS proxy 502 first determines whether the subscriber is in-network or out of network by sending a number portability query 804 to number portability database 504 and receiving number portability reply 806 indicating that the subscriber has been ported, and identifies the switch in the recipient network to which a SIP INVITE message should be sent, e.g., SW2 512B. HSS proxy 502 communicates the identity of SW2 512B to the requesting network entity I-CSCF 510, e.g., via LIA 808. I-CSCF 510 uses this information and sends a SIP INVITE message 810 to the identified serving switch SW2 512B.

FIG. 9 is an exemplary call flow diagram illustrating signaling messages exchanged during an exemplary process for providing a home subscriber server proxy according to an embodiment of the subject matter described herein, where an IMS subscriber is not ported but is migrated to a different technology.

In FIG. 9, I-CSCF 510 receives a SIP INVITE message 900 that identifies a called party, CDP. I-CSCF 510 issues a Diameter location information request (LIR) message 902 to HSS proxy 502, requesting location information for subscriber CDP. HSS proxy 502 first determines whether the subscriber is in-network or out of network by sending a number portability query 904 to number portability database 504 and receiving number portability reply 906 indicating that the subscriber is not ported.

HSS proxy 502 then issues a technology migration query 908 to technology migration database 506 to determine whether the subscriber has been migrated to a different technology. In the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 9, technology migration database 506 sends to HSS proxy 502 a technology migration response 910 that indicates that the subscriber has been migrated to a different technology, and identifies a serving switch having the appropriate network technology, e.g., SW3 512C. HSS proxy 502 communicates the identity of SW3 512C to the requesting network entity I-CSCF 510, e.g., via LIA 912. I-CSCF 510 uses this information and sends a SIP INVITE message 914 to the identified serving switch SW3 512C.

Although FIGS. 7, 8, and 9 show HSS proxy 502 receiving a Diameter LIR message and responding with a Diameter LIA message, other Diameter request/answer messages may be similarly treated, including but not limited to: user authorization request (UAR) and user authorization answer (UAA); user data request (UDR) and user data answer (UDA); and media authorization request (MAR) and media authorization answer (MAA).

Likewise, the subject matter described herein is not limited to IMS networks but may also be applied to other types of networks, as shown in FIGS. 10 through 13, described below.

FIG. 10 is a block diagram illustrating an exemplary system for providing a home location register proxy according to an embodiment of the subject matter described herein. Telecommunications network 1000 includes a location information proxy 1002 for receiving a request for location information associated with a subscriber, hereinafter referred to as subscriber location information. In response to receiving the subscriber location information request, location information proxy 1002 accesses one or more of a number portability database 1004, a technology migration database 1006, and a location database 1008 to determine the subscriber location information, which location information proxy 1002 communicates to the entity that requested the location information.

In the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 10, location information database 1008 may be a home location register, or HLR, in which case location information proxy 1002 may also be referred to as HLR proxy 1002.

HLR proxy 1002 may receive subscriber location information requests from entities within network 1000 that process signaling messages that are associated with a mobile subscriber. In the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 10, HLR proxy 1002 may receive subscriber location information requests from a mobile switching center (MSC) node, such as MSC 1010. Example requests include SS7 mobile application part (MAP) messages, such as a send routing information (SRI) message.

HLR proxy 1002 responds to the subscriber location information request by sending the subscriber location information to the requesting entity. Example responses include MAP messages, such as the send routing information acknowledge (SRI_ACK) message. Other message protocols may be used.

The location information provided by HLR proxy 1002 may include the address or other identifier of a node in the network that is currently serving the mobile subscriber or to which call setup messages, such as ISUP IAM, SAM, or BICC messages, should be directed for the purpose of setting up a call with the mobile subscriber. In the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 10, network 1000 includes three switches, SW1 1012A, SW2 1012B, and SW3 1012C.

In one embodiment, technology migration database 1006 includes current technology registration information for dual mode subscribers and where HLR proxy 1002 accesses the current technology registration information to determine a technology type for which the subscriber is currently registered.

In one embodiment, HLR proxy 1002 and one or more of one or more of number portability database 1012, technology migration database 1014, and location database 1016 are components of a signal routing node, such as a signal transfer point (STP).

FIG. 11 is a flow chart illustrating an exemplary process for providing a home location register proxy according to an embodiment of the subject matter described herein. This process will now be described in reference to FIGS. 10 and 11.

At block 1100, a home location register proxy node receives, from a requesting network entity, a request for subscriber information maintained at a home location register, the information being associated with a subscriber. For example, in the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 10, HLR proxy 1002 may receive a SRI message from MSC 1010, where the SRI identifies a called party subscriber.

At block 1102, in response to receiving the request for subscriber information maintained at a home location register, the home location register proxy node provides the information associated with the subscriber to the requesting network entity on behalf of the home location register. The steps of this process are listed in detail starting at block 1104.

At block 1104, it is determined whether the subscriber has been ported to a recipient network. For example, in the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 10, HLR proxy 1002 may issue a number portability (NP) query to number portability database 1004 to determine whether the subscriber has been ported to another network.

At block 1106, in response to determining that the subscriber has been ported to a recipient network, the identity of a switch that is associated with the recipient network is provided to the requesting network entity. For example, in the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 10, if the subscriber has been ported to a donor network, the NP database 1004 may return a location routing number (LRN), uniform resource identifier (URI), IP address/port, SS7 point code address, or other switch identifier associated with the recipient network.

At block 1108, in response to determining that the subscriber is not ported to a recipient network, it is determined whether the subscriber has been migrated to a different technology. In the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 10, HLR proxy 1002 may query technology migration database 1006 using the identity of the subscriber to determine whether the subscriber has been migrated to a different technology.

At block 1110, in response to determining that the subscriber has been migrated to a different technology, the identity of a switch that is associated with the migrated-to technology is provided to the requesting network entity. In the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 10, network 1000 may include switches of different technologies. For example, in one embodiment, SW1 1012A may be GSM switch, SW2 1012B may be an IS-41 switch, and SW3 1012C may be an IMS switch, and LTE switch, or a switch of yet another technology. Depending on the migrated-to technology of the subscriber, HLR proxy 1002 may respond to MSC 1010 with the network address of SW1 1012A, SW2 1012B, or SW3 1012C.

FIG. 12 is an exemplary call flow diagram illustrating signaling messages exchanged during an exemplary process for providing a home location register proxy according to an embodiment of the subject matter described herein, where a GSM subscriber is not ported or migrated to a different technology. FIG. 12 illustrates a network containing a mobile switching center MSC 1000, HLR proxy 1002, number portability database 1004, technology migration database 1006, and home location register 1008. In FIG. 12, MSC 1000 receives an Integrated services digital network user part (ISUP) initial address message 1200 for attempting to place a call to subscriber CDP. MSC 1000 issues a mobile application part (MAP) send routing information (SRI) message 1202 to HLR proxy 1002. To determine whether subscriber CDP has been ported out of the network, HLR proxy 1002 sends a number portability request 1204 to number portability database 1004. In the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 12, NP database 1004 sends a number portability response 1206 indicating that subscriber CDP is not ported.

HLR proxy 1002 then issues a technology migration query 1208 to TM database 1006 to determine whether subscriber CDP has been migrated to a different technology. In the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 12, TM database 1006 sends a technology migration response 1210 indicating that subscriber CDP has not been migrated to a different technology. Technology migration response 1210 identifies a serving switch of the appropriate network technology, identified by RN.

HLR proxy 1002 then issues a MAP SRI message 1212 to HLR 1008. HLR 1008 responds with a MAP SRI_ACK message 1214 identifying the switch that is associated with the subscriber. In the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 12, the switch is identified by a visited mobile switching center (vMSC) address or routing number (RN). In other embodiments, the switch may be identified by network names, network addresses, or other forms of identification.

Finally, HLR proxy 1002 communicates the identity of the serving switch to the requesting network entity, by sending MAP SRI_ACK message 1216 to MSC 1000, the message including the LRN of the switch that currently serves subscriber CDP.

FIG. 13 is an exemplary call flow diagram illustrating signaling messages exchanged during an exemplary process for providing a home location register proxy according to an embodiment of the subject matter described herein, where a GSM subscriber is not ported but is migrated to a different technology. The functions of MSC 1000, HLR proxy 1002, NP 1004, TM 1006, and HLR 1008 are essentially identical to their like-numbered counterparts in FIG. 10, and therefore descriptions of their functions will not be repeated here

In FIG. 13, MSC 1000 receives an integrated services digital network user part (ISUP) initial address message 1300 for attempting to place a call to subscriber CDP. MSC 1000 issues a mobile application part (MAP) send routing information (SRI) message 1302 to HLR proxy 1002. To determine whether subscriber CDP has been ported out of the network, HLR proxy 1002 sends a number portability request 1304 to number portability database 1004. In the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 13, NP database 1004 sends a number portability response 1306 indicating that subscriber CDP is not ported.

HLR proxy 1002 then issues a technology migration query 1308 to TM database 1006 to determine whether subscriber CDP has been migrated to a different technology. In the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 13, TM database 1006 sends a technology migration response 1310 indicating that subscriber CDP has been migrated to a different technology. Technology migration response 1310 identifies a serving switch of the appropriate network technology, identified by RN.

Finally, HLR proxy 1002 communicates the identity of the serving switch to the requesting network entity, by sending MAP SRI_ACK message 1312 to MSC 1000, the message indicating that the subscriber has migrated to a switch that is identified by the included RN.

It will be understood that various details of the subject matter described herein may be changed without departing from the scope of the subject matter described herein. Furthermore, the foregoing description is for the purpose of illustration only, and not for the purpose of limitation.

Claims

1. A method for providing a home subscriber server proxy, the method comprising:
at a home subscriber server (HSS) proxy separate from a home subscriber server in a telecommunications network, wherein the home subscriber server maintains subscriber location information:
receiving, from a requesting network entity, a request for information maintained at the home subscriber server, the information being associated with a subscriber; and
in response to receiving the request for information maintained at home subscriber server, providing, from the HSS proxy, the information associated with the subscriber to the requesting network entity on behalf of the home subscriber server, wherein providing the information associated with the subscriber on behalf of the home subscriber server comprises performing a number portability lookup in a number portability database associated with the HSS proxy, determining whether the subscriber is ported out, and in response to determining that the subscriber is ported out, returning information identifying a switch currently serving the subscriber in a network to which the subscriber has been ported.
at a home subscriber server (HSS) proxy separate from a home subscriber server in a telecommunications network, wherein the home subscriber server maintains subscriber location information:
receiving, from a requesting network entity, a request for information maintained at the home subscriber server, the information being associated with a subscriber; and
in response to receiving the request for information maintained at home subscriber server, providing, from the HSS proxy, the information associated with the subscriber to the requesting network entity on behalf of the home subscriber server, wherein providing the information associated with the subscriber on behalf of the home subscriber server comprises performing a number portability lookup in a number portability database associated with the HSS proxy, determining whether the subscriber is ported out, and in response to determining that the subscriber is ported out, returning information identifying a switch currently serving the subscriber in a network to which the subscriber has been ported.
receiving, from a requesting network entity, a request for information maintained at the home subscriber server, the information being associated with a subscriber; and
in response to receiving the request for information maintained at home subscriber server, providing, from the HSS proxy, the information associated with the subscriber to the requesting network entity on behalf of the home subscriber server, wherein providing the information associated with the subscriber on behalf of the home subscriber server comprises performing a number portability lookup in a number portability database associated with the HSS proxy, determining whether the subscriber is ported out, and in response to determining that the subscriber is ported out, returning information identifying a switch currently serving the subscriber in a network to which the subscriber has been ported.
2. The method of claim 1 wherein providing the information associated with the subscriber to the requesting network entity on behalf of the home subscriber server comprises:
in response to determining that the subscriber is not ported out, determining whether the subscriber has been migrated to a different technology, and, in response to determining that the subscriber has been migrated to a different technology, providing, to the requesting network entity, information identifying a switch that is associated with the migrated-to technology.
in response to determining that the subscriber is not ported out, determining whether the subscriber has been migrated to a different technology, and, in response to determining that the subscriber has been migrated to a different technology, providing, to the requesting network entity, information identifying a switch that is associated with the migrated-to technology.
3. The method of claim 2 wherein providing the information associated with the subscriber to the requesting network entity on behalf of the home subscriber server further comprises:
determining that the subscriber is not ported out or migrated to a different technology; and
in response to determining that the subscriber is not ported out or migrated to a different technology, querying the home subscriber server to retrieve the information associated with the subscriber, and providing, to the requesting network entity, the information retrieved from the home subscriber server.
determining that the subscriber is not ported out or migrated to a different technology; and
in response to determining that the subscriber is not ported out or migrated to a different technology, querying the home subscriber server to retrieve the information associated with the subscriber, and providing, to the requesting network entity, the information retrieved from the home subscriber server.
4. The method of claim 1 wherein receiving the request for information maintained at a home subscriber server comprises receiving a request for location information associated with the subscriber.
5. The method of claim 1 wherein receiving the request for information maintained at a home subscriber server comprises receiving a Diameter protocol request.
6. The method of claim 5 wherein receiving the Diameter protocol request comprises receiving a location information request (LIR) message and wherein providing the information associated with the subscriber to the requesting network entity comprises sending a location information answer (LIA) message to the requesting network entity.
7. The method of claim 1 wherein receiving a request for subscriber information from a requesting network entity comprises receiving a request from a call session control function (CSCF).
8. The method of claim 7 wherein the CSCF sends the request in response to receiving a session initiation protocol (SIP) INVITE message.
9. The method of claim 1 wherein the information that identifies the switch currently serving the subscriber comprises at least one of: a location routing number (LRN); a universal resource identifier (URI); an Internet protocol (IP) address; and a signaling system number 7 (SS7) point code.
10. The method of claim 1 comprising, at the network node, correlating TCP connections with switches and SCTP associations with HSS nodes.
11. A system for providing a home subscriber server proxy, the system comprising:
at least one database that includes number portability information, technology migration information, and information maintained at a home subscriber server that maintains information about subscriber location; and
a home subscriber server proxy node for receiving, from a requesting network entity, a request for information maintained at the home subscriber server, the information being associated with a subscriber, and, in response to receiving the request for information maintained at the home subscriber server, providing, from the HSS proxy node, the information associated with the subscriber to the requesting network entity on behalf of the home subscriber server, wherein providing the information associated with the subscriber on behalf of the home subscriber server comprises performing a number portability lookup in a number portability database associated with the HSS proxy, determining whether the subscriber is ported out, and in response to determining that the subscriber is ported out, returning information identifying a switch currently serving the subscriber in a network to which the subscriber has been ported.
at least one database that includes number portability information, technology migration information, and information maintained at a home subscriber server that maintains information about subscriber location; and
a home subscriber server proxy node for receiving, from a requesting network entity, a request for information maintained at the home subscriber server, the information being associated with a subscriber, and, in response to receiving the request for information maintained at the home subscriber server, providing, from the HSS proxy node, the information associated with the subscriber to the requesting network entity on behalf of the home subscriber server, wherein providing the information associated with the subscriber on behalf of the home subscriber server comprises performing a number portability lookup in a number portability database associated with the HSS proxy, determining whether the subscriber is ported out, and in response to determining that the subscriber is ported out, returning information identifying a switch currently serving the subscriber in a network to which the subscriber has been ported.
12. The system of claim 11 wherein the home subscriber server proxy node is configured to provide the information associated with the subscriber to the requesting network entity on behalf of the home subscriber server by:
in response to determining that the subscriber is not ported out, determining whether the subscriber has been migrated to a different technology, and, in response to determining that the subscriber has been migrated to a different technology, providing, to the requesting network entity, information identifying a switch that is associated with the migrated-to technology.
in response to determining that the subscriber is not ported out, determining whether the subscriber has been migrated to a different technology, and, in response to determining that the subscriber has been migrated to a different technology, providing, to the requesting network entity, information identifying a switch that is associated with the migrated-to technology.
13. The system of claim 11 wherein the home subscriber server proxy node is configured to provide the information associated with the subscriber to the requesting network entity on behalf of the home subscriber server by, in response to determining that the subscriber is not ported out or migrated to a different technology, querying the home subscriber server to retrieve the information associated with the subscriber, and providing, to the requesting network entity, the information retrieved from the home subscriber server.
14. The system of claim 11 wherein the at least one database includes a single home subscriber server proxy database and wherein the home subscriber server proxy accesses the number portability information, the technology migration information, and the information maintained at a home subscriber server in single access to the database.
15. The system of claim 11 wherein the at least one database includes current technology registration information for dual mode subscribers and wherein the home subscriber server proxy accesses the current technology registration information to determine a technology type for which the subscriber is currently registered.
16. The system of claim 11 wherein the home subscriber server proxy and the at least one database are components of a signal transfer point.
17. The system of claim 11 wherein the requesting network entity comprises a session initiation protocol (SIP) routing node.
18. The system of claim 11 wherein the request for information maintained at a home subscriber server comprises a request for location information associated with the subscriber.
19. The system of claim 11 wherein the request for information maintained at a home subscriber server comprises a Diameter protocol message.
20. The system of claim 11 wherein the home subscriber server proxy is configured to correlate TCP connections with switching nodes and SCTP associations with HSS nodes.
21. A non-transitory computer readable medium having stored thereon executable instructions that when executed by the processor of a computer control the computer to perform steps comprising:
receiving, at a home subscriber server (HSS) proxy separate from a home subscriber server and from a requesting network entity, a request for information maintained at the home subscriber server, the information being associated with a subscriber, wherein the home subscriber server maintains subscriber location information; and
in response to receiving the request for information maintained at the home subscriber server, providing, from the HSS proxy, the information associated with the subscriber to the requesting network entity on behalf of the home subscriber server, wherein providing the information associated with the subscriber on behalf of the home subscriber server comprises performing a number portability lookup in a number portability database associated with the HSS proxy, determining whether the subscriber is ported out, and in response to determining that the subscriber is ported out, returning information identifying a switch currently serving the subscriber in a network to which the subscriber has been ported.
receiving, at a home subscriber server (HSS) proxy separate from a home subscriber server and from a requesting network entity, a request for information maintained at the home subscriber server, the information being associated with a subscriber, wherein the home subscriber server maintains subscriber location information; and
in response to receiving the request for information maintained at the home subscriber server, providing, from the HSS proxy, the information associated with the subscriber to the requesting network entity on behalf of the home subscriber server, wherein providing the information associated with the subscriber on behalf of the home subscriber server comprises performing a number portability lookup in a number portability database associated with the HSS proxy, determining whether the subscriber is ported out, and in response to determining that the subscriber is ported out, returning information identifying a switch currently serving the subscriber in a network to which the subscriber has been ported.