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Influence of Dietary Spices on Protein Digestibility and Absorption in Experimental Rats

Research paper by Usha N. S. Prakash, Krishnapura Srinivasan

Indexed on: 14 Aug '16Published on: 27 Mar '13Published in: Food Digestion: Research and Current Opinion



Abstract

Abstract Since spice diets are known to cause significant reduction in food transit time, an animal study was carried out to verify if there is any undesirable compromise with nutrient bioavailability, especially fat and protein digestion and absorption. Young rats were maintained for 6 weeks on diets containing (in gram percent): ginger (0.05), ajowan (0.2), cumin (1.25), and piperine (0.02). Soya protein and casein were incorporated to the basal semisynthetic diets to make up the sole protein source at 9 % protein level (N × 6.25) in an otherwise isocaloric and isonitrogenous diets. Nitrogen content of urine and feces were determined during the last week of feeding regimen. True protein digestibility, biological value, nitrogen balance, and net protein utilization were calculated. Dietary fat absorption was also determined. It was observed that the test spices reduced food transit time, but there was no undesirable compromise with the protein (casein or soya protein) digestion and absorption. All the four test spices in both the test protein groups showed increased protein and fat absorption and utilization. Thus, dietary intake of spices—ginger, ajowan, piperine, and cumin—enhances fat and protein digestion as well as their absorption despite causing a significant reduction in the ororectal food transit time.AbstractSince spice diets are known to cause significant reduction in food transit time, an animal study was carried out to verify if there is any undesirable compromise with nutrient bioavailability, especially fat and protein digestion and absorption. Young rats were maintained for 6 weeks on diets containing (in gram percent): ginger (0.05), ajowan (0.2), cumin (1.25), and piperine (0.02). Soya protein and casein were incorporated to the basal semisynthetic diets to make up the sole protein source at 9 % protein level (N × 6.25) in an otherwise isocaloric and isonitrogenous diets. Nitrogen content of urine and feces were determined during the last week of feeding regimen. True protein digestibility, biological value, nitrogen balance, and net protein utilization were calculated. Dietary fat absorption was also determined. It was observed that the test spices reduced food transit time, but there was no undesirable compromise with the protein (casein or soya protein) digestion and absorption. All the four test spices in both the test protein groups showed increased protein and fat absorption and utilization. Thus, dietary intake of spices—ginger, ajowan, piperine, and cumin—enhances fat and protein digestion as well as their absorption despite causing a significant reduction in the ororectal food transit time.