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Inflammation and oxidative stress are associated with the prevalence of high aankle-brachial index in metabolic syndrome patients without chronic renal failure.

Research paper by Yinyin Y Zhang, Jie J Chen, Kun K Zhang, Minyi M Kong, Tao T Wang, Renhua R Chen, Lily L Wang, Jingfeng J Wang, Hui H Huang

Indexed on: 19 Jan '13Published on: 19 Jan '13Published in: International journal of medical sciences



Abstract

High ankle-brachial index (ABI) is marker of increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, while the relationship and mechanism between high ABI and metabolic syndrome (MetS) are unclear. The objectives of this study were to determine the relationship and possible mechanism of MetS with high ABI.341 participants without CRF were recruited. Among these participants, 58 participants (ABI ≥ 1.3) were include in high ABI group and the other 283 participants (0.9 < ABI < 1.3) were include in normal ABI group. Furthermore, these 341 participants were also divided into MetS group (n = 54) and non-MetS group (n = 287). All participants received examinations including body mass index (BMI), ABI and related biochemical parameters.Compared with non-MetS group, the prevalence of high ABI was higher in MetS group (27.8% vs. 15%, p < 0.05). Participants with 3-4 metabolic risk factors had higher prevalence of high ABI than those with 0-1 metabolic risk factors (27.8% vs. 12.7%, p < 0.05). The prevalence of high ABI in overweight participants was higher than those with normal body weight. And the participants with hypertension also had higher prevalence of high ABI than normotensive participants. BMI, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were all higher in high ABI group than normal ABI group (p < 0.05).More metabolic risk factors have increased the risk of high ABI. Inflammation and oxidative stress are associated with prevalence of high ABI in metabolic syndrome patients without chronic renal failure.