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In adolescence a higher 'eveningness in energy intake' is associated with higher total daily energy intake.

Research paper by Tanja T Diederichs, Ines I Perrar, Sarah S Roßbach, Ute U Alexy, Anette E AE Buyken

Indexed on: 31 May '18Published on: 31 May '18Published in: Appetite



Abstract

The present manuscript addressed two hypotheses: (i) As children age, energy intake is shifted from morning (energy intake <11am) to evening hours (energy intake >6pm) (ii) A higher 'eveningness in energy intake' (i.e. evening minus morning energy intake). is associated with a higher total daily energy intake. Data were analyzed from 262 DONALD cohort study participants, who had completed at least one 3-day weighed dietary record in the age groups 3/4, 5/6, 7/8, 9/10, 11/12, 13/14, 15/16 and 17/18 years (y). 'Eveningness in energy intake' was compared across age groups and related to total daily energy intake for each age group (multiple cross-sectional analyses). 'Eveningness' increased progressively from age group 3/4y to age group 17/18y. A median surplus of evening energy intake (i.e. when evening intake exceeded morning intake) was firstly observed for age group 11/12y. From age group 11/12y onwards, a higher 'eveningness' was associated with a higher total daily energy intake (all p < 0.04). Difference in total daily energy intake between the highest and the lowest tertile of 'eveningness' was largest for age group 17/18y, amounting to an 11% higher intake among adolescents in the highest as compared to those in the lowest tertile. In conclusion, energy intake progressively shifts from morning to evening hours, as children age. Once evening energy intake exceeds morning energy intake, a higher 'eveningness in energy intake' is associated with higher total daily energy intake. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.