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High glucose intake and glycaemic level in critically ill neonates with inherited metabolic disorders of intoxication.

Research paper by Marion M Grimaud, Pascale P de Lonlay, Laurent L Dupic, Jean-Baptiste JB Arnoux, Anais A Brassier, Philippe P Hubert, Fabrice F Lesage, Mehdi M Oualha

Indexed on: 30 Mar '16Published on: 30 Mar '16Published in: European Journal of Pediatrics



Abstract

To investigate glycaemic levels in critically ill neonates with inherited metabolic disorders of intoxication. Thirty-nine neonates with a median age of 7 days (0-24) were retrospectively included (urea cycle disorders (n = 18), maple syrup disease (n = 13), organic acidemias (n = 8)). Twenty-seven neonates were intubated, 21 were haemodialysed and 6 died. During the first 3 days, median total and peak blood glucose (BG) levels were 7.1 mmol/L (0.9-50) and 10 mmol/L (5.1-50), respectively. The median glucose intake rate was 11 mg/kg/min (2.7-15.9). Fifteen and 23 neonates exhibited severe hyperglycaemia (≥2 BG levels >12 mmol/L) and mild hyperglycaemia (≥2 BG levels >7 and ≤12 mmol/L), respectively. Glycaemic levels and number of hyperglycaemic neonates decreased over the first 3 days (p < 0.001) while total glucose intake rate was stable (p = 0.11). Enteral route of glucose intake was associated with a lower number of hyperglycaemic neonates (p = 0.04) and glycaemic level (p = 0.02).Hyperglycaemia is common in critically ill neonates receiving high glucose intake with inherited metabolic disorders of intoxication. Physicians should decrease the rate of total glucose intake and begin enteral feeding as quickly as possible in cases of persistent hyperglycaemia. What is Known: • The risk of hyperglycaemia in the acute phase of critical illness is high. What is New: • Hyperglycaemia is common in the initial management of critically ill neonates with inherited metabolic disorders of intoxication receiving high glucose intake.