Quantcast

Functional heartburn, nonerosive reflux disease, and reflux esophagitis are all distinct conditions—A debate: Con

Research paper by Lucía C. Fry, Klaus Mönkemüller; Peter Malfertheiner

Indexed on: 23 Aug '16Published on: 01 Dec '07Published in: Current GERD Reports



Abstract

Abstract Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is currently defined as a condition that develops when the reflux of stomach contents causes recurrent symptoms, complications, or both. The clinical presentation of GERD has been recognized to be much broader than just the typical symptoms of heartburn and acid regurgitation, sometimes including various other symptoms (mainly extraesophageal), including abdominal pain and even sleep disturbance. There is an important overlap with functional gastrointestinal disorders such as functional dyspepsia and irritable bowel syndrome. The morphologic spectrum of esophageal involvement in GERD encompasses erosive reflux disease (ERD), Barrett’s esophagus (BE), and nonerosive reflux disease (NERD), but there is still no consensus on whether GERD is one disease that can progress from NERD to ERD and BE or whether it is a spectrum of different conditions, each with its own clinical, pathophysiologic, and endoscopic characteristics. Recent data suggest considerable movement between categories. GERD appears to be a disease with a spectrum of clinical and endoscopic manifestations, with characteristics that make it a continuum and not a categorical condition with separate entities.AbstractGastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is currently defined as a condition that develops when the reflux of stomach contents causes recurrent symptoms, complications, or both. The clinical presentation of GERD has been recognized to be much broader than just the typical symptoms of heartburn and acid regurgitation, sometimes including various other symptoms (mainly extraesophageal), including abdominal pain and even sleep disturbance. There is an important overlap with functional gastrointestinal disorders such as functional dyspepsia and irritable bowel syndrome. The morphologic spectrum of esophageal involvement in GERD encompasses erosive reflux disease (ERD), Barrett’s esophagus (BE), and nonerosive reflux disease (NERD), but there is still no consensus on whether GERD is one disease that can progress from NERD to ERD and BE or whether it is a spectrum of different conditions, each with its own clinical, pathophysiologic, and endoscopic characteristics. Recent data suggest considerable movement between categories. GERD appears to be a disease with a spectrum of clinical and endoscopic manifestations, with characteristics that make it a continuum and not a categorical condition with separate entities.