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Feeding and nonnutritive sucking habits and prevalence of open bite and crossbite in children/adolescents with Down syndrome.

Research paper by Ana Cristina AC Oliveira, Isabela Almeida IA Pordeus, Cintia Silva CS Torres, Milene Torres MT Martins, Saul Martins SM Paiva

Indexed on: 21 May '10Published on: 21 May '10Published in: The Angle orthodontist



Abstract

To analyze the influence of breastfeeding, bottle feeding, and nonnutritive sucking habits on the prevalence of open bite and anterior/posterior crossbite in children with Down syndrome (DS).A cross-sectional study was carried out in 112 pairs of mothers/children with DS between 3 and 18 years of age at a maternal/children's hospital in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The children with DS were clinically examined for the presence of open bite as well as anterior and posterior crossbite. Information on breastfeeding, bottle feeding, and nonnutritive sucking habits was collected using a structured questionnaire. The control variables were age and mouth posture of children/adolescents and mother's schooling. Statistical analysis of the data was performed using the chi-square test and multiple logistic regression.The prevalence of anterior open bite was 21%, anterior crossbite was 33%, and posterior crossbite was 31%. The use of bottle feeding for more than 24 months (prevalence ratio [PR] = 1.6) was associated with the occurrence of open bite. Having breastfed for less than 6 months (PR = 1.4) and pacifier sucking for more than 24 months (PR = 3.1) were associated with the prevalence of anterior crossbite. Finger sucking (PR = 2.9) and the use of bottle feeding for more than 24 months (PR = 2.6) were associated with posterior crossbite.The prevalence of open bite and crossbite in children with DS was associated with the use of bottle feeding and pacifier sucking for more than 24 months, breastfeeding for less than 6 months, and finger sucking.