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Enhanced removal of arsenite and arsenate by a multifunctional Fe-Ti-Mn composite oxide: Photooxidation, oxidation and adsorption.

Research paper by Wei W Zhang, Gaosheng G Zhang, Caihong C Liu, Juan J Li, Tong T Zheng, Jun J Ma, Lu L Wang, Jin J Jiang, Xuedong X Zhai

Indexed on: 14 Oct '18Published on: 14 Oct '18Published in: Water Research



Abstract

In order to attain a high-efficiency and low-cost adsorbent for both arsenate (As(V)) and arsenite (As(III)) removal from As-contaminated water, a novel nanostructured Fe-Ti-Mn composite oxide (FTMO) was fabricated through a one-step simultaneous oxidation and co-precipitation method. Batch control experiments and series of spectroscopy detection technologies were carried out to investigate the surface change of the FTMO adsorbent and the respective role of Fe, Ti and Mn content in the arsenic adsorption process. The results showed that the FTMO adsorbent had a high adsorption capacity for both As(V) and As(III) (especially for the latter one) via the formation of inner-sphere complexes at the water/oxide interface under both darkness and light conditions. The material could effectively oxidize As(III) to As(V) and light illumination could further apparently enhance the As(III) oxidation, thus achieving high adsorption efficiency of As(III). Combined with the characterizations from FTIR, ESR and XPS, it was assumed that the predominant As(III) removal mechanism could be attributed to the coupling of various processes including photooxidation, oxidation and adsorption. The Ti and Mn contents were dominant for the As(III) oxidation, while the Fe content mainly played an important role for the adsorption of newly formed As(V). However, the involvement of surface hydroxyl groups and the formation of inner-sphere surface complexes were primarily responsible for the As(V) adsorption mechanism. Moreover, the successful removal of arsenic from real water matrices made the FTMO a potentially attractive adsorbent for both As(V) and As(III) removal. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.