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Early valve ablation can decrease the incidence of bladder dysfunction in boys with posterior urethral valves.

Research paper by Mohamed M Youssif, Waleed W Dawood, Samir S Shabaan, Ibrahim I Mokhless, Ahmed A Hanno

Indexed on: 21 Aug '09Published on: 21 Aug '09Published in: The Journal of Urology®



Abstract

Valve bladder syndrome represents the worst end of the posterior urethral valve spectrum. Recent data suggest that early valve ablation can provide the chance for the bladder to heal and improve dynamics. We tested the hypothesis that early valve ablation can decrease the incidence of bladder dysfunction in these boys.A total of 16 full-term males with prenatally diagnosed hydronephrosis and a full bladder proved postnatally to have posterior urethral valve were studied. Valve ablation was performed during the neonatal period (group 1). The records of 16 boys with posterior urethral valves who underwent valve ablation after age 1 year were obtained (group 2). Ultrasound was performed every month and urodynamics were performed every 6 months. At age 3 years voiding diary and toilet training results were obtained. The incidence of bladder dysfunction in the 2 groups was recorded according to clinical, ultrasound, voiding cystourethrogram and urodynamic parameters.Mean followup was 3 years. Post-void residual urine, measured as more than 30% of expected bladder capacity for age, improved in 14 patients (87.5%) in group 1 and in 10 (62.5%) in group 2. Excluding cases of vesicoureteral reflux-renal dysplasia syndrome, vesicoureteral reflux was present in 20 renal units initially in group 1 and showed resolution or improvement in 16. In group 2 vesicoureteral reflux was present in 26 units and improved in 14. At last followup mean cystometric bladder capacity, measured at 30 cc H(2)O, in group 1 was 145 +/- 22 ml which was comparable to age matched normal bladder capacity. In group 2 mean +/- SD cystometric bladder capacity was 130 +/- 30 ml, which was significantly lower than age matched normal bladder capacity. Hypocompliance and instability were significantly lower in group 1. Toilet training was easier and yielded better results for dryness in group 1. Overall bladder dysfunction was present in 2 boys (12.5%) in group 1 and in 8 (50%) in group 2.Neonatal valve ablation would protect the bladder and allow normal cycling, which helps in bladder healing. This underscores the importance of routine prenatal screening and early intervention at a specialized center.