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Doing Euclidean Plane Geometry Using Projective Geometric Algebra

Research paper by Charles G. Gunn

Indexed on: 09 Nov '16Published on: 18 Oct '16Published in: Advances in Applied Clifford Algebras



Abstract

Abstract The article presents a new approach to euclidean plane geometry based on projective geometric algebra (PGA). It is designed for anyone with an interest in plane geometry, or who wishes to familiarize themselves with PGA. After a brief review of PGA, the article focuses on \(\mathbf {P}(\mathbb {R}^*_{2,0,1}) \) , the PGA for euclidean plane geometry. It first explores the geometric product involving pairs and triples of basic elements (points and lines), establishing a wealth of fundamental metric and non-metric properties. It then applies the algebra to a variety of familiar topics in plane euclidean geometry and shows that it compares favorably with other approaches in regard to completeness, compactness, practicality, and elegance. The seamless integration of euclidean and ideal (or “infinite”) elements forms an essential and novel feature of the treatment. Numerous figures accompany the text. For readers with the requisite mathematical background, a self-contained coordinate-free introduction to the algebra is provided in an appendix.AbstractThe article presents a new approach to euclidean plane geometry based on projective geometric algebra (PGA). It is designed for anyone with an interest in plane geometry, or who wishes to familiarize themselves with PGA. After a brief review of PGA, the article focuses on \(\mathbf {P}(\mathbb {R}^*_{2,0,1}) \) , the PGA for euclidean plane geometry. It first explores the geometric product involving pairs and triples of basic elements (points and lines), establishing a wealth of fundamental metric and non-metric properties. It then applies the algebra to a variety of familiar topics in plane euclidean geometry and shows that it compares favorably with other approaches in regard to completeness, compactness, practicality, and elegance. The seamless integration of euclidean and ideal (or “infinite”) elements forms an essential and novel feature of the treatment. Numerous figures accompany the text. For readers with the requisite mathematical background, a self-contained coordinate-free introduction to the algebra is provided in an appendix. \(\mathbf {P}(\mathbb {R}^*_{2,0,1}) \) \(\mathbf {P}(\mathbb {R}^*_{2,0,1}) \)