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Digital pathology and anatomic pathology laboratory information system integration to support digital pathology sign-out

Research paper by Huazhang Guo, Joe Birsa, Navid Farahani, Douglas J Hartman, Anthony Piccoli, Matthew O'Leary, Jeffrey McHugh, Mark Nyman, Curtis Stratman, Vanja Kvarnstrom, Samuel Yousem, Liron Pantanowitz

Indexed on: 13 May '16Published on: 04 May '16Published in: Journal of pathology informatics



Abstract

Huazhang Guo, Joe Birsa, Navid Farahani, Douglas J Hartman, Anthony Piccoli, Matthew O'Leary, Jeffrey McHugh, Mark Nyman, Curtis Stratman, Vanja Kvarnstrom, Samuel Yousem, Liron Pantanowitz Journal of Pathology Informatics 2016 7(1):23-23 Background: The adoption of digital pathology offers benefits over labor-intensive, time-consuming, and error-prone manual processes. However, because most workflow and laboratory transactions are centered around the anatomical pathology laboratory information system (APLIS), adoption of digital pathology ideally requires integration with the APLIS. A digital pathology system (DPS) integrated with the APLIS was recently implemented at our institution for diagnostic use. We demonstrate how such integration supports digital workflow to sign-out anatomical pathology cases. Methods: Workflow begins when pathology cases get accessioned into the APLIS (CoPathPlus). Glass slides from these cases are then digitized (Omnyx VL120 scanner) and automatically uploaded into the DPS (Omnyx; Integrated Digital Pathology (IDP) software v.1.3). The APLIS transmits case data to the DPS via a publishing web service. The DPS associates scanned images with the correct case using barcode labels on slides and information received from the APLIS. When pathologists remotely open a case in the DPS, additional information (e.g. gross pathology details, prior cases) gets retrieved from the APLIS through a query web service. Results: Following validation of this integration, pathologists at our institution have signed out more than 1000 surgical pathology cases in a production environment. Integration between the APLIS and DPS enabled pathologists to review digital slides while simultaneously having access to pertinent case metadata. The introduction of a digital workflow eliminated costly manual tasks involving matching of glass slides and avoided delays waiting for glass slides to be delivered. Conclusion: Integrating the DPS and APLIS were instrumental for successfully implementing a digital solution at our institution for pathology sign-out. The integration streamlined our digital sign-out workflow, diminished the potential for human error related to matching slides, and improved the sign-out experience for pathologists.