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Differentiating impulsive and premeditated aggression: self and informant perspectives among adolescents with personality pathology.

Research paper by Kris J KJ Gauthier, R Michael RM Furr, Charles W CW Mathias, Dawn M DM Marsh-Richard, Donald M DM Dougherty

Indexed on: 10 Mar '09Published on: 10 Mar '09Published in: Journal of personality disorders



Abstract

Previous research has articulated the conceptual differentiation of impulsive and premeditated aggression. Little, if any, of this research has examined personological differences among adolescents with aggression-oriented pathology, and little, if any, has examined both self and informant perspectives. The current study examined such differentiation within a Conduct Disorder population in which normal and pathological personality characteristics were examined via self- and informant-report. Results indicated the two forms of aggression were independent: high impulsive aggression was associated with high Neuroticism, but high premeditated aggression was associated with low Agreeableness and high Extraversion. Overall, adolescents high in impulsive aggression had a pattern of personality characteristics that are seen as socially-detached and emotionally volatile. In contrast, adolescents high in premeditated aggression had a pattern of characteristics seen as egocentric and socially-engaged but without concern for others. The results have implications for the social and motivational mechanisms producing the two forms of aggression.