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Design of Injectable Materials to Improve Stem Cell Transplantation

Research paper by Laura M. Marquardt, Sarah C. Heilshorn

Indexed on: 18 Aug '16Published on: 01 Jul '16Published in: Current Stem Cell Reports



Abstract

Abstract Stem cell-based therapies are steadily gaining traction for regenerative medicine approaches to treating disease and injury throughout the body. While a significant body of work has shown success in preclinical studies, results often fail to translate in clinical settings. One potential cause is the massive transplanted cell death that occurs post-injection, preventing functional integration with host tissue. Therefore, current research is focusing on developing injectable hydrogel materials to protect cells during delivery and to stimulate endogenous regeneration through interactions of transplanted cells and host tissue. This review explores the design of targeted injectable hydrogel systems for improving the therapeutic potential of stem cells across a variety of tissue engineering applications with a focus on hydrogel materials that have progressed to the stage of preclinical testing.AbstractStem cell-based therapies are steadily gaining traction for regenerative medicine approaches to treating disease and injury throughout the body. While a significant body of work has shown success in preclinical studies, results often fail to translate in clinical settings. One potential cause is the massive transplanted cell death that occurs post-injection, preventing functional integration with host tissue. Therefore, current research is focusing on developing injectable hydrogel materials to protect cells during delivery and to stimulate endogenous regeneration through interactions of transplanted cells and host tissue. This review explores the design of targeted injectable hydrogel systems for improving the therapeutic potential of stem cells across a variety of tissue engineering applications with a focus on hydrogel materials that have progressed to the stage of preclinical testing.