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Depression and parenting in youth with type 1 diabetes: Are general and diabetes-specific parenting behaviors associated with depressive symptoms over a 2-year period?

Research paper by Katherine W. Dempster, Aiyi Liu, Tonja R. Nansel

Indexed on: 29 Jan '19Published on: 29 Jan '19Published in: Journal of Behavioral Medicine



Abstract

To examine cross-sectional and longitudinal associations of general parenting style and diabetes-specific parenting behaviors with depression in youth with type 1 diabetes. Participants (n = 390) completed self-report measures of depression at baseline and 2-year follow-up, general parenting style at baseline, and diabetes-specific parenting (conflict, task involvement, and collaborative involvement) at baseline and every 6 months. Logistic regression examined associations of parenting with depression at baseline and 2-year follow-up. A less authoritative parenting style, lower parent collaborative involvement, and greater diabetes-related conflict were associated with baseline depression in the model simultaneously including all parenting variables and covariates. Lower parent collaborative involvement and higher diabetes-related conflict were associated with depression at 2-year follow-up, adjusting for baseline depression and covariates. Parent task involvement was not associated with depression at either time. Findings suggest a protective role of parenting in reducing the risk of depression in youth with type 1 diabetes.