Quantcast

Comparison of antiemetics for nausea and vomiting of pregnancy in an emergency department setting.

Research paper by Elizabeth A EA Mayhall, Robyn R Gray, Vrishali V Lopes, Kristen A KA Matteson

Indexed on: 30 Apr '15Published on: 30 Apr '15Published in: American Journal of Emergency Medicine



Abstract

To compare time from medication administration to disposition from the Emergency Department (ED) between women treated for nausea and vomiting of pregnancy with different antiemetic agents.We performed a retrospective cohort study of women 13 weeks gestation or less treated in our Women and Infants Hospital ED for nausea and vomiting of pregnancy between 2009 and 2011. Data was collected on patient demographics, antiemetics used, and time to disposition. We analyzed time of administration of the antiemetic used first line (ondansetron versus metoclopramide versus promethazine or prochlorperazine) to time the discharge order was placed.We analyzed data from 439 women treated in the ED for nausea and vomiting of pregnancy. Forty-four percent received ondansetron alone, 47% received any other antiemetic alone, and 9% received more than one agent first line. Antiemetic agent selected did not differ by patient age, parity, current treatment for nausea and vomiting in pregnancy, orthostatics, ketonuria or disposition. We found no difference in time from medication administration to disposition between women who received ondansetron and women who received any other antiemetic (metoclopramide, prochlorperazine or promethazine). Adjusting for potential confounders, compared to patients who received any other first line therapy, patients who received ondansetron had 2.09 times the odds of having a time to disposition at or above the 75th percentile (95% CI 1.31-3.34).The use of ondansetron in the ED for nausea and vomiting of pregnancy was associated with similar mean time from administration to disposition as other antiemetics.