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Cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia co-morbid with hearing impairment: a randomized controlled trial.

Research paper by Markus M Jansson-Fröjmark, Steven J SJ Linton, Ida K IK Flink, Sarah S Granberg, Berth B Danermark, Annika A Norell-Clarke

Indexed on: 11 Feb '12Published on: 11 Feb '12Published in: Journal of Clinical Psychology in Medical Settings



Abstract

The purpose of the current study was to examine the effects of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT-I) for insomnia on patients with insomnia co-morbid with hearing impairment. A randomized controlled design was used with a 3-month follow-up. Thirty-two patients with insomnia co-morbid with hearing impairment were randomized to either CBT-I or a waitlist condition (WLC). The primary outcome was insomnia severity. Secondary outcomes were sleep diary parameters, dysfunction, anxiety, and depression. Compared to WLC, CBT-I resulted in lower insomnia severity at post-treatment and at follow-up (d = 1.18-1.56). Relative to WLC, CBT-I also led, at both assessment points, to reduced total wake time (d = 1.39) and increased sleep restoration (d = 1.03-1.07) and sleep quality (d = 0.91-1.16). Both groups increased their total sleep time, but no significant group difference emerged. Compared to WLC, CBT-I resulted in higher function (d = 0.81-0.96) and lower anxiety (d = 1.29-1.30) at both assessment points. Neither CBT-I nor WLC led to improvement on depression. Based on the Insomnia Severity Index, more CBT-I (53-77%) than WLC participants (0-7%) were treatment responders. Also, more CBT-I (24%) than WLC participants (0%) remitted. In patients with insomnia co-morbid with hearing impairment, CBT-I was effective in decreasing insomnia severity, subjective sleep parameters, dysfunction, and anxiety. These findings are in line with previous results on the effects of CBT-I in other medical conditions.