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Carers' express positive views on the acceptability, efficacy and safety of buccal midazolam for paediatric status epilepticus.

Research paper by Arif A Khan, Aravindhan A Baheerathan, Gururaj G Setty, Nahin N Hussain

Indexed on: 03 Dec '13Published on: 03 Dec '13Published in: Acta Paediatrica



Abstract

Buccal midazolam has emerged as an effective alternative to rectal diazepam in the management of paediatric status epilepticus. This study aimed to identify carers' views on the safety, efficacy and acceptability of buccal midazolam in the management of this common neurological emergency.Community-based, face-to-face interviews were carried out with 34 carers to evaluate the effectiveness, adverse effects and convenience of buccal midazolam as a rescue treatment for prolonged seizures. All children received 2.5 to 10 mg of Epistatus, a proprietary oral solution (10 mg/mL). We evaluated therapeutic success, time taken for seizures to cease and the need to attend the emergency department, together with the development of side effects, namely respiratory depression and sedation.Most of the families (91%) found that buccal midazolam was always, or usually, effective in stopping seizures and it prevented hospital admission in 65% of cases. The majority (96%) of those who had used both buccal midazolam and rectal diazepam preferred the former as it was easier to administer, more socially acceptable and did not sedate the child as much.Carers felt that buccal midazolam was an effective, safe and more acceptable alternative to rectal diazepam in the management of paediatric status epilepticus.