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Assessment of the course of acute pancreatitis in the light of aetiology: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Research paper by Emese Réka ER Bálint, Gabriella G Fűr, Lóránd L Kiss, Dávid István DI Németh, Alexandra A Soós, Péter P Hegyi, Zsolt Z Szakács, Benedek B Tinusz, Péter P Varjú, Áron Á Vincze, Bálint B Erőss, József J Czimmer, Zoltán Z Szepes, Gábor G Varga, Zoltán Z Rakonczay

Indexed on: 24 Oct '20Published on: 23 Oct '20Published in: Scientific Reports



Abstract

The main causes of acute pancreatitis (AP) are biliary disease, alcohol consumption, hypertriglyceridaemia (HTG) and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). The aim of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the effects of these aetiological factors on the severity and outcome of AP. Pubmed and Embase were searched between 01/01/2012 and 31/05/2020. Included articles involved adult alcoholic, biliary, HTG- or post-ERCP AP (PAP) patients. Primary outcome was severity, secondary outcomes were organ failures, intensive care unit admission, recurrence rate, pancreatic necrosis, mortality, length of hospital stay, pseudocyst, fluid collection and systematic inflammatory response syndrome. Data were analysed from 127 eligible studies. The risk for non-mild (moderately severe and severe) condition was the highest in HTG-induced AP (HTG-AP) followed by alcoholic AP (AAP), biliary AP (BAP) and PAP. Recurrence rate was significantly lower among BAP vs. HTG-AP or AAP patients (OR = 2.69 and 2.98, 95% CI 1.55-4.65 and 2.22-4.01, respectively). Mortality rate was significantly greater in HTG-AP vs. AAP or BAP (OR = 1.72 and 1.50, 95% CI 1.04-2.84 and 0.96-2.35, respectively), pancreatic necrosis occurred more frequently in AAP than BAP patients (OR = 1.58, 95% CI 1.08-2.30). Overall, there is a potential association between aetiology and the development and course of AP. HTG-AP is associated with the highest number of complications. Furthermore, AAP is likely to be more severe than BAP or PAP. Greater emphasis should be placed on determining aetiology on admission.